$2,400 clocks for MPs: Thailand’s wasteful spending

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bodet clocksThailand has a big budget, approximately $76 billion for 2013.

This year alone, we’ve found that:

  • $68 billion has been spent on transportation projects.
  • $9.5 billion for flood management.
  • $1 billion to support rubber farms.
  • $479,655 on digital clocks.

What?

Adding a new spin on the motif that “time is money”; the clocks were bought because parliament had trouble with their old ones. Officials were unable to manage time effectively, and so, throwing money at better time telling machines felt seemingly okay at the time.

Out of the 240 clocks purchased, each one cost around $2,400, being shipped in time to adorn the walls of parliament as the House (ironically) debated about the 2014 budget on August 14.

The outspoken and concerned people of the internet rushed to their keyboards as soon as they found out about the pricey purchases of the lavish clocks. They posted similar clocks made in Germany that could be bought for $537 each (shouldn’t they be paid for finding better deals?)

Support for the purchases came from the deputy secretary-general of parliament. Firstly, he denied that the clocks cost $2,400 apiece as reported by the media; secondly, that the $479,655 spent included a support system via satellite connection that insures absolute accuracy; and lastly, that, if there ever was a power blackout, the built-in-power reserve would keep the clocks running for another eight hours.

The clocks are also weather resistant.

Compared to other projects, the wasteful spending on gaudy clocks seems insignificant; yet, such purchases can develop into bad habits, like allegedly paying Tony Blair $640,000 to speak at a government sponsored forum.

There’s something professional about having a clock so accurate that it’s finely tuned down to the last digit, but not so much when it’s wasteful spending.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Thailand has a big budget, approximately $76 billion for 2013.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

bodet clocksThailand has a big budget, approximately $76 billion for 2013.

This year alone, we’ve found that:

  • $68 billion has been spent on transportation projects.
  • $9.5 billion for flood management.
  • $1 billion to support rubber farms.
  • $479,655 on digital clocks.

What?

Adding a new spin on the motif that “time is money”; the clocks were bought because parliament had trouble with their old ones. Officials were unable to manage time effectively, and so, throwing money at better time telling machines felt seemingly okay at the time.

Out of the 240 clocks purchased, each one cost around $2,400, being shipped in time to adorn the walls of parliament as the House (ironically) debated about the 2014 budget on August 14.

The outspoken and concerned people of the internet rushed to their keyboards as soon as they found out about the pricey purchases of the lavish clocks. They posted similar clocks made in Germany that could be bought for $537 each (shouldn’t they be paid for finding better deals?)

Support for the purchases came from the deputy secretary-general of parliament. Firstly, he denied that the clocks cost $2,400 apiece as reported by the media; secondly, that the $479,655 spent included a support system via satellite connection that insures absolute accuracy; and lastly, that, if there ever was a power blackout, the built-in-power reserve would keep the clocks running for another eight hours.

The clocks are also weather resistant.

Compared to other projects, the wasteful spending on gaudy clocks seems insignificant; yet, such purchases can develop into bad habits, like allegedly paying Tony Blair $640,000 to speak at a government sponsored forum.

There’s something professional about having a clock so accurate that it’s finely tuned down to the last digit, but not so much when it’s wasteful spending.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid