65% of Thais are fine with corruption

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Thai corruptionA survey among around 2,100 people all over Thailand conducted from July 1 to 5 by Abac Poll Research Center, a department of the Assumption University, found that 65 per cent of respondents accept corruption as long as they also benefited from such activity.

The result was little changed from a survey done in March, when 65.5 per cent said corruption was acceptable. The figure has been 60 per cent or higher ever since Abac Poll began the survey in November 2011.

Thailand is the 7th most corrupt country in ASEAN, according to the Corruption Perception Index of Transparency International.

The highest acceptance level of corruption, at 73 per cent, was found among respondents aged between 30 and 39 years old. By occupation, the group with the highest acceptance level was farmers and daily labourers at 78.9 per cent, followed by students and university students at 73.3 per cent, employees of private organisations (67.1 per cent), housewives and retirees (63.5 per cent), traders and entrepreneurs (62.8 per cent), civil servants and employees of state enterprises (54 per cent).

Abac Poll called the results “a dangerous attitude among the majority of people”. The research said it believes that to change “unhealthy” attitudes, a “more truly democratic system” was needed and more transparency in the auditing system for the administration of the state budget.

Corruption is one of the main problems that foreign investors are facing in the country.

A report by the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce earlier in 2013 indicated that graft accounted for about 30 to 35 per cent of the cost of state procurement projects. That worked out to more around $10 billion or up to 2.5 per cent of gross domestic product.

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A survey among around 2,100 people all over Thailand conducted from July 1 to 5 by Abac Poll Research Center, a department of the Assumption University, found that 65 per cent of respondents accept corruption as long as they also benefited from such activity. The result was little changed from a survey done in March, when 65.5 per cent said corruption was acceptable. The figure has been 60 per cent or higher ever since Abac Poll began the survey in November 2011. Thailand is the 7th most corrupt country in ASEAN, according to the Corruption Perception Index of Transparency International....

Reading Time: 1 minute

Thai corruptionA survey among around 2,100 people all over Thailand conducted from July 1 to 5 by Abac Poll Research Center, a department of the Assumption University, found that 65 per cent of respondents accept corruption as long as they also benefited from such activity.

The result was little changed from a survey done in March, when 65.5 per cent said corruption was acceptable. The figure has been 60 per cent or higher ever since Abac Poll began the survey in November 2011.

Thailand is the 7th most corrupt country in ASEAN, according to the Corruption Perception Index of Transparency International.

The highest acceptance level of corruption, at 73 per cent, was found among respondents aged between 30 and 39 years old. By occupation, the group with the highest acceptance level was farmers and daily labourers at 78.9 per cent, followed by students and university students at 73.3 per cent, employees of private organisations (67.1 per cent), housewives and retirees (63.5 per cent), traders and entrepreneurs (62.8 per cent), civil servants and employees of state enterprises (54 per cent).

Abac Poll called the results “a dangerous attitude among the majority of people”. The research said it believes that to change “unhealthy” attitudes, a “more truly democratic system” was needed and more transparency in the auditing system for the administration of the state budget.

Corruption is one of the main problems that foreign investors are facing in the country.

A report by the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce earlier in 2013 indicated that graft accounted for about 30 to 35 per cent of the cost of state procurement projects. That worked out to more around $10 billion or up to 2.5 per cent of gross domestic product.

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