ADB gets involved in Cambodia’s post-election impasse

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Takehiko Nakao
Asian Development Bank President Takehiko Nakao

Cambodia’s opposition leader Sam Rainsy has asked the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to suspend funding to Cambodia, whose government he says was not formed legally following the July 2013 elections.

In a letter to ADB President Takehiko Nakao, Sam Rainsy, president of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, said the country currently has a one-party government, with the opposition refusing to take part in National Assembly meetings following an election it says was lost through irregularities and fraud.

“As a result of the above-mentioned constitutional coup and ongoing political deadlock, the Asian Development Bank should suspend any agreements with the current government led by Mr. Hun Sen,” Sam Rainsy wrote. “The ADB should also refrain from signing any new agreements with this government, which does not represent the Cambodian people and thus cannot legally make any commitment on behalf of Cambodia.”

No opposition lawmakers-elect – 55 in total – have attended National Assembly sessions, making parliamentary decisions by 68 ruling party lawmakers unconstitutional, Sam Rainsy wrote. “

Please take into consideration the possible legal consequences of any operation by the ADB in such a context where there is no legal and legitimate government,” he added.

Cheam Yiep, a lawmaker for the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), said funds received by the government help all of Cambodia, including its opposition. Cambodia is not a one-party state, he said, referring to the opposition lawmakers who have not attended Assembly sessions.

“However, the CPP cannot aim a gun at the opposition to make them join parliament,” he said.

The ADB provides millions of dollars to Cambodia in aid and loans, for a railroad project, poverty reduction and other programmes.

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[caption id="attachment_16440" align="alignleft" width="300"] Asian Development Bank President Takehiko Nakao[/caption] Cambodia's opposition leader Sam Rainsy has asked the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to suspend funding to Cambodia, whose government he says was not formed legally following the July 2013 elections. In a letter to ADB President Takehiko Nakao, Sam Rainsy, president of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, said the country currently has a one-party government, with the opposition refusing to take part in National Assembly meetings following an election it says was lost through irregularities and fraud. “As a result of the above-mentioned constitutional coup and ongoing political deadlock, the...

Reading Time: 1 minute

Takehiko Nakao
Asian Development Bank President Takehiko Nakao

Cambodia’s opposition leader Sam Rainsy has asked the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to suspend funding to Cambodia, whose government he says was not formed legally following the July 2013 elections.

In a letter to ADB President Takehiko Nakao, Sam Rainsy, president of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, said the country currently has a one-party government, with the opposition refusing to take part in National Assembly meetings following an election it says was lost through irregularities and fraud.

“As a result of the above-mentioned constitutional coup and ongoing political deadlock, the Asian Development Bank should suspend any agreements with the current government led by Mr. Hun Sen,” Sam Rainsy wrote. “The ADB should also refrain from signing any new agreements with this government, which does not represent the Cambodian people and thus cannot legally make any commitment on behalf of Cambodia.”

No opposition lawmakers-elect – 55 in total – have attended National Assembly sessions, making parliamentary decisions by 68 ruling party lawmakers unconstitutional, Sam Rainsy wrote. “

Please take into consideration the possible legal consequences of any operation by the ADB in such a context where there is no legal and legitimate government,” he added.

Cheam Yiep, a lawmaker for the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), said funds received by the government help all of Cambodia, including its opposition. Cambodia is not a one-party state, he said, referring to the opposition lawmakers who have not attended Assembly sessions.

“However, the CPP cannot aim a gun at the opposition to make them join parliament,” he said.

The ADB provides millions of dollars to Cambodia in aid and loans, for a railroad project, poverty reduction and other programmes.

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