Another sign Japan loves the Philippines

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Japan and Philippine relations just got a whole lot cozier.

Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met Philippine President Benigno Aquino III on July 25 to boost cooperation with the archipelago over growing maritime disputes with China, further solidifying an already healthy economic partnership.

The meeting, which comes as tensions steadily rise between the Philippines and China, adds a political element to the already ardent economic support that Japan has been providing. Japan is the largest investor in the Philippines, pumping a highly welcomed amount of money into the country’s ailing manufacturing industry.

“For Japan, the Philippines is a strategic partner with whom we share fundamental values and many strategic interests,” Abe told a joint news conference with President Aquino in Manila.

Indeed, rising wages in China coupled with protests by an at times uncontainable jingoist movement has repelled Japan away and towards emerging markets in Southeast Asia.

“The Prime Minister and I agreed to strengthen maritime cooperation which is a pillar of our strategic partnership,” Aquino said early on July 27.

Abe’s visit came during a time of heightened tensions between the two North Asia powerhouses, with Japan making fresh accusations that its neighbour has launched a greater number of ships for disputed islands in the East China Sea.

But beyond rising costs in China, there seems to be a more heart-felt answer to this fond support.

“The Philippines is a good destination for the manufacturing industry,” Nobuo Fujii, executive director of the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Philippines, said on June 25.

Filipino workers, Nobuo said, are also disciplined in their work.

Earlier in 2013, Japan announced that a loan would be extended for the Philippines to purchase 10 naval patrol vessels.

The visit by Abe further underscores the growing polarity in Asia away from China, with Japan adding a pivotal influence in greater claim made in the South China Sea.

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Japan and Philippine relations just got a whole lot cozier.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Japan and Philippine relations just got a whole lot cozier.

Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met Philippine President Benigno Aquino III on July 25 to boost cooperation with the archipelago over growing maritime disputes with China, further solidifying an already healthy economic partnership.

The meeting, which comes as tensions steadily rise between the Philippines and China, adds a political element to the already ardent economic support that Japan has been providing. Japan is the largest investor in the Philippines, pumping a highly welcomed amount of money into the country’s ailing manufacturing industry.

“For Japan, the Philippines is a strategic partner with whom we share fundamental values and many strategic interests,” Abe told a joint news conference with President Aquino in Manila.

Indeed, rising wages in China coupled with protests by an at times uncontainable jingoist movement has repelled Japan away and towards emerging markets in Southeast Asia.

“The Prime Minister and I agreed to strengthen maritime cooperation which is a pillar of our strategic partnership,” Aquino said early on July 27.

Abe’s visit came during a time of heightened tensions between the two North Asia powerhouses, with Japan making fresh accusations that its neighbour has launched a greater number of ships for disputed islands in the East China Sea.

But beyond rising costs in China, there seems to be a more heart-felt answer to this fond support.

“The Philippines is a good destination for the manufacturing industry,” Nobuo Fujii, executive director of the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Philippines, said on June 25.

Filipino workers, Nobuo said, are also disciplined in their work.

Earlier in 2013, Japan announced that a loan would be extended for the Philippines to purchase 10 naval patrol vessels.

The visit by Abe further underscores the growing polarity in Asia away from China, with Japan adding a pivotal influence in greater claim made in the South China Sea.

 

 

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