Artificial meat: World’s first lab-burger comes for $375,000

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What at least scientists call “the biggest agricultural revolution since the domestication of livestock” was the presentation of the first beef burger created from stem cells harvested from a living cow on august 5 in London.

The concept has been developed by Dutch stem cell researcher Mark Post of Maastricht University and aims at nothing less than creating meat without the need for slaughtering animals. Post grew the burger  from bovine stem cells in his lab at an estimated cost of $375,000, reportedly back by a US billionaire.

It has not been reported how the artificial meat burger tastes. However, supporters of genetically modified food say that  the lab burger was “just normal beef as it consists of cow cells.”

Commercial production could start in a decade, says Post. One sample of stem cells is enough to create up to 20,000 tonnes of meat in the lab, but development costs are currently the biggest obstacle.

The discussion about artificially produced meat is not new. Scientists say alternatives are needed to avoid depleting too much of the earth’s resources as the world population According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, global meat consumption may increase from roughly 228 million tonnes in 2002 to about 465 million tonnes in 2050.

Artificial meat production would use up to 60 per cent less energy, resulting in up to 95 per cent lower greenhouse gas emissions and 98 per cent lower land use compared with conventional production in Europe, according to a study by Oxford University and University of Amsterdam researchers.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Click to enlarge

What at least scientists call “the biggest agricultural revolution since the domestication of livestock” was the presentation of the first beef burger created from stem cells harvested from a living cow on august 5 in London.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

How it works
Click to enlarge

What at least scientists call “the biggest agricultural revolution since the domestication of livestock” was the presentation of the first beef burger created from stem cells harvested from a living cow on august 5 in London.

The concept has been developed by Dutch stem cell researcher Mark Post of Maastricht University and aims at nothing less than creating meat without the need for slaughtering animals. Post grew the burger  from bovine stem cells in his lab at an estimated cost of $375,000, reportedly back by a US billionaire.

It has not been reported how the artificial meat burger tastes. However, supporters of genetically modified food say that  the lab burger was “just normal beef as it consists of cow cells.”

Commercial production could start in a decade, says Post. One sample of stem cells is enough to create up to 20,000 tonnes of meat in the lab, but development costs are currently the biggest obstacle.

The discussion about artificially produced meat is not new. Scientists say alternatives are needed to avoid depleting too much of the earth’s resources as the world population According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, global meat consumption may increase from roughly 228 million tonnes in 2002 to about 465 million tonnes in 2050.

Artificial meat production would use up to 60 per cent less energy, resulting in up to 95 per cent lower greenhouse gas emissions and 98 per cent lower land use compared with conventional production in Europe, according to a study by Oxford University and University of Amsterdam researchers.

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