ASEAN meeting overshadowed by tensions

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SCS dispute
South China Sea: Asia’s biggest military troubespot

The disastrous haze caused by Indonesian forest fires over the past weeks and rekindled territorial disputes in the South China Sea are among the topics that will likely lead to heated debates at several ASEAN meetings in Brunei from June 29 to July 2, including the 46th ASEAN Foreign Ministers’ Meeting and the 20th ASEAN Regional Forum.

Singapore has sent its Foreign Affairs Minister and Minister for Law, K Shanmugam and the Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Second Minister for the Environment and Water Resources and Second Minister for Foreign Affairs, Grace Fu, to discuss the haze issue with their Indonesian counterparts and find ways of how to avoid such disasters in the future.

The countries will look for way to further intensify regional and international cooperation including those under  the  ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution, which aims at promoting efforts among ASEAN member states to ensure the full and effective implementation of zero burning techniques in land clearing.

It is expected that the ministers will also touch upon the issue of oil palm plantation firms allegedly not complying to these standards.

Another issue are the rising tension between China and ASEAN member states, particularly the Philippines, over territorial conflicts in the South China Sea, seen as Asia’s biggest current military troublespot.

The Philippines has launched a joint military exercise with the US in the region in the past days, prompting China to warn of a “counterstrike” if “provocations” continue. The spat comes at a time when China-US relations are deteriorating over the issue of American whistleblower Edward Snowden who has been allowed to leave his hideout in Hong Kong as per the order of China’s government, much to the discontent of the US.

At stake are potentially massive offshore oil reserves, and the  seas also lie on shipping lanes and fishing grounds. Both China and the Philippines have been locked in a decades-old territorial quarrel over the South China Sea.

Representatives of China and the US are present at the Brunei meetings. North Korea in a rare move also sent a delegate, Foreign Minister Pak Ui-chun.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

South China Sea: Asia’s biggest military troubespot

The disastrous haze caused by Indonesian forest fires over the past weeks and rekindled territorial disputes in the South China Sea are among the topics that will likely lead to heated debates at several ASEAN meetings in Brunei from June 29 to July 2, including the 46th ASEAN Foreign Ministers’ Meeting and the 20th ASEAN Regional Forum.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

SCS dispute
South China Sea: Asia’s biggest military troubespot

The disastrous haze caused by Indonesian forest fires over the past weeks and rekindled territorial disputes in the South China Sea are among the topics that will likely lead to heated debates at several ASEAN meetings in Brunei from June 29 to July 2, including the 46th ASEAN Foreign Ministers’ Meeting and the 20th ASEAN Regional Forum.

Singapore has sent its Foreign Affairs Minister and Minister for Law, K Shanmugam and the Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Second Minister for the Environment and Water Resources and Second Minister for Foreign Affairs, Grace Fu, to discuss the haze issue with their Indonesian counterparts and find ways of how to avoid such disasters in the future.

The countries will look for way to further intensify regional and international cooperation including those under  the  ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution, which aims at promoting efforts among ASEAN member states to ensure the full and effective implementation of zero burning techniques in land clearing.

It is expected that the ministers will also touch upon the issue of oil palm plantation firms allegedly not complying to these standards.

Another issue are the rising tension between China and ASEAN member states, particularly the Philippines, over territorial conflicts in the South China Sea, seen as Asia’s biggest current military troublespot.

The Philippines has launched a joint military exercise with the US in the region in the past days, prompting China to warn of a “counterstrike” if “provocations” continue. The spat comes at a time when China-US relations are deteriorating over the issue of American whistleblower Edward Snowden who has been allowed to leave his hideout in Hong Kong as per the order of China’s government, much to the discontent of the US.

At stake are potentially massive offshore oil reserves, and the  seas also lie on shipping lanes and fishing grounds. Both China and the Philippines have been locked in a decades-old territorial quarrel over the South China Sea.

Representatives of China and the US are present at the Brunei meetings. North Korea in a rare move also sent a delegate, Foreign Minister Pak Ui-chun.

Do you like this post?
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