ASEAN: Nuclear power is still far off

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Nuke signNuclear power has been an issue in discussion over a long time in ASEAN, as many countries want to overcome their energy shortages with this relatively cheap form of energy generation. However, while some nations have developed solid nuclear programmes over the past decade, the disaster of Fukushima in March 2011 has thwarted these plans, which have only slowly begun to pick up pace again.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) foresees that ASEAN members could produce 2 gigawatts by employing nuclear energy by 2020. Inside Investor looks at what’s currently on the plate:

Vietnam is the most active nation in this field compared to its neighbours, and the country has set a clear nuclear energy roadmap that defines the framework for the utilisation of nuclear sources in domestic energy generation. The plan, created in 2008, with the issuing of the Nuclear Energy Law, aims to set up nuclear infrastructure that is able to produce 15,000 megawatts by 2030, or 10 per cent of the country’s electricity production, through seven nuclear power plants with 14 reactors.

The government plans to begin the construction of its first plants, Ninh Thuan 1 and Ninh Thuan 2, by 2014 and to start operations by 2020. Ninh Thuan 1 will include four 1,200-megawatt reactors, and the construction will be financed by a $8-billion loan from Russia. Ninh Thuan 2 will consist of four 1,000-megawatt reactors and is planned to be commissioned by 2021.

In addition, Vietnam has signed various cooperation agreements with Japan, Russia and France to strengthen research collaboration, as well as the creation of an atomic research institute to train manpower and improve safety management practices.

Indonesia has also developed a domestic nuclear plan that intends to cover 4 per cent of national electricity needs through nuclear energy by 2025. Three research reactors have already been built in order to study the feasibility of the development of nuclear power in the country: Kartini in Yogyakarta, MPR RSG-GA Siwabessy in Serpong and Triga Mark III in Bandung. The government has also announced an agreement with Russia for the construction of a fluctuant nuclear plant in Gorontalo. However, the plan has been delayed and nuclear power is currently under heavy public debate.

Malaysia is carrying out feasibility studies in order to evaluate the development of nuclear energy. The government approved in 2008 the National Nuclear Plan that intends to build two new plants by 2021 and 2022 to meet rising energy demand.

The Philippines was the first ASEAN country to complete a nuclear power plant in 1985, the Bataan Nuclear Plant, but it never opened and today lies practically in ruins. In 2008, the government wanted to open the plant but faced strong protests and the plan was dismissed. Again in 2012, authorities announced that they are considering nuclear energy as a long-term national goal, and by 2025 operations would start in the 2,000-megawatt nuclear facility after being commissioned by the government.

Thailand is also planning to reduce its dependency on natural gas to produce electricity. The government plans to complete the country’s fist nuclear facility by 2026, but it has repeatedly faced protests in Surat Thani province, as well as in the Kalasin province where plants would be built.

Myanmar had a small-scale atomic research center launched in 2007 through a cooperation agreement with Russia, but it was dismissed in 2012.

Brunei, Cambodia and Laos currently have no plans to develop nuclear programmes, while Singapore’s government has recently declared that it is considering the development of nuclear reactors “to face long-term energy needs.”

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Nuclear power has been an issue in discussion over a long time in ASEAN, as many countries want to overcome their energy shortages with this relatively cheap form of energy generation. However, while some nations have developed solid nuclear programmes over the past decade, the disaster of Fukushima in March 2011 has thwarted these plans, which have only slowly begun to pick up pace again. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) foresees that ASEAN members could produce 2 gigawatts by employing nuclear energy by 2020. Inside Investor looks at what's currently on the plate: Vietnam is the most active nation...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Nuke signNuclear power has been an issue in discussion over a long time in ASEAN, as many countries want to overcome their energy shortages with this relatively cheap form of energy generation. However, while some nations have developed solid nuclear programmes over the past decade, the disaster of Fukushima in March 2011 has thwarted these plans, which have only slowly begun to pick up pace again.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) foresees that ASEAN members could produce 2 gigawatts by employing nuclear energy by 2020. Inside Investor looks at what’s currently on the plate:

Vietnam is the most active nation in this field compared to its neighbours, and the country has set a clear nuclear energy roadmap that defines the framework for the utilisation of nuclear sources in domestic energy generation. The plan, created in 2008, with the issuing of the Nuclear Energy Law, aims to set up nuclear infrastructure that is able to produce 15,000 megawatts by 2030, or 10 per cent of the country’s electricity production, through seven nuclear power plants with 14 reactors.

The government plans to begin the construction of its first plants, Ninh Thuan 1 and Ninh Thuan 2, by 2014 and to start operations by 2020. Ninh Thuan 1 will include four 1,200-megawatt reactors, and the construction will be financed by a $8-billion loan from Russia. Ninh Thuan 2 will consist of four 1,000-megawatt reactors and is planned to be commissioned by 2021.

In addition, Vietnam has signed various cooperation agreements with Japan, Russia and France to strengthen research collaboration, as well as the creation of an atomic research institute to train manpower and improve safety management practices.

Indonesia has also developed a domestic nuclear plan that intends to cover 4 per cent of national electricity needs through nuclear energy by 2025. Three research reactors have already been built in order to study the feasibility of the development of nuclear power in the country: Kartini in Yogyakarta, MPR RSG-GA Siwabessy in Serpong and Triga Mark III in Bandung. The government has also announced an agreement with Russia for the construction of a fluctuant nuclear plant in Gorontalo. However, the plan has been delayed and nuclear power is currently under heavy public debate.

Malaysia is carrying out feasibility studies in order to evaluate the development of nuclear energy. The government approved in 2008 the National Nuclear Plan that intends to build two new plants by 2021 and 2022 to meet rising energy demand.

The Philippines was the first ASEAN country to complete a nuclear power plant in 1985, the Bataan Nuclear Plant, but it never opened and today lies practically in ruins. In 2008, the government wanted to open the plant but faced strong protests and the plan was dismissed. Again in 2012, authorities announced that they are considering nuclear energy as a long-term national goal, and by 2025 operations would start in the 2,000-megawatt nuclear facility after being commissioned by the government.

Thailand is also planning to reduce its dependency on natural gas to produce electricity. The government plans to complete the country’s fist nuclear facility by 2026, but it has repeatedly faced protests in Surat Thani province, as well as in the Kalasin province where plants would be built.

Myanmar had a small-scale atomic research center launched in 2007 through a cooperation agreement with Russia, but it was dismissed in 2012.

Brunei, Cambodia and Laos currently have no plans to develop nuclear programmes, while Singapore’s government has recently declared that it is considering the development of nuclear reactors “to face long-term energy needs.”

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