Bald Singapore students told to wear wigs

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Bald students1Singaporean female students who shaved their heads for charity were told to wear wigs by the school’s principal.

“It’s very clear in our mission: it’s about their turnout as a young lady,” said Marion Tan, principal of St. Margaret’s Secondary School.

“Punk, unfeminine or sloppy hairstyles” are not allowed in our school, she said, concerned of the prospects that the bald hairstyles would incur a trend.

“Can you imagine if I were to say yes, I’d have everybody coming to school with a bald head? Sometimes it’s a fad, so they would take advantage of the situation,” Tan argued.

One day, Cherry Wong and Leia Lai, both 15 years old, arrived to school, both with their heads shaved in support of the Children Cancer Foundation (CCF)’s event “Hair for Hope.” The two students had previously promised the principal that they would wear wigs. Punished with suspensions of two class lessons, the two girls were made to sit it in the general office, and then taken by a parent volunteer to buy $70 wigs.

Reactions to the treatments were mixed, with some feeling that the principal shouldn’t have punished the students, while others said they broke their promises to the school rules. But despite the banned baldness, it prompted further awareness, with Emily Chia, the mother of Leia Lai saying that she was joyful that the story went viral.

“I’m glad that it created the awareness that we wanted to create, although our intention was never to shame the school or to shame the principal,” Chia said. “I think I just wanted the girls to have the recognition they should have gotten instead of being reprimanded.”

The fundraiser is meant to lead participators by making a bald statement in support of children with cancer and their families. Their website states that “Every shaven head in Hair for Hope represents the understanding by an individual of the ordeals that a child with cancer is subjected to. By volunteering to shave, shavees become CCF ambassadors in helping to raise awareness of childhood cancer among their family and friends.” The foundation has already raised more than $100,000,000 in contributions from individuals and groups.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Singaporean female students who shaved their heads for charity were told to wear wigs by the school’s principal.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bald students1Singaporean female students who shaved their heads for charity were told to wear wigs by the school’s principal.

“It’s very clear in our mission: it’s about their turnout as a young lady,” said Marion Tan, principal of St. Margaret’s Secondary School.

“Punk, unfeminine or sloppy hairstyles” are not allowed in our school, she said, concerned of the prospects that the bald hairstyles would incur a trend.

“Can you imagine if I were to say yes, I’d have everybody coming to school with a bald head? Sometimes it’s a fad, so they would take advantage of the situation,” Tan argued.

One day, Cherry Wong and Leia Lai, both 15 years old, arrived to school, both with their heads shaved in support of the Children Cancer Foundation (CCF)’s event “Hair for Hope.” The two students had previously promised the principal that they would wear wigs. Punished with suspensions of two class lessons, the two girls were made to sit it in the general office, and then taken by a parent volunteer to buy $70 wigs.

Reactions to the treatments were mixed, with some feeling that the principal shouldn’t have punished the students, while others said they broke their promises to the school rules. But despite the banned baldness, it prompted further awareness, with Emily Chia, the mother of Leia Lai saying that she was joyful that the story went viral.

“I’m glad that it created the awareness that we wanted to create, although our intention was never to shame the school or to shame the principal,” Chia said. “I think I just wanted the girls to have the recognition they should have gotten instead of being reprimanded.”

The fundraiser is meant to lead participators by making a bald statement in support of children with cancer and their families. Their website states that “Every shaven head in Hair for Hope represents the understanding by an individual of the ordeals that a child with cancer is subjected to. By volunteering to shave, shavees become CCF ambassadors in helping to raise awareness of childhood cancer among their family and friends.” The foundation has already raised more than $100,000,000 in contributions from individuals and groups.

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