Bali tells tourists to stay despite looming volcano eruption

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Tour operators and tourism officials in Bali asked tourists to stay because they had “nothing to fear” from a possible volcanic eruption of Mount Agung in the northeast of the island which could, according to geologists, happen at any time. The emergency status for Bali’s rumbling and smoking volcano has just been extended until October 26 as Mount Agung remains on the highest alert level.

However, the Bali Tourism Board insists that Bali was still a place safe for visits since 98 per cent of the island were out of the 12-kilometer danger zone around the volcano’s crater and wouldn’t be affected. That is, as long a volcanic ash cloud does not blow towards touristic centers or the airport, which would temporarily shut down air traffic.

While three major tourist spots have felt an impact by increased seismic activity so far, namely Besakih Temple, Tulamben beach and Tirta Gangga, other popular holiday destinations including Sanur, Kuta, Nusa Dua and Ubud would not be affected, the board said.

Instead, Bali’s tourism officials said visitors with bookings are invited to come to the island anyhow, and they, together with tour operators, have started  a promotion campaign on Twitter under #IaminBaliNOW to ease fears visitors might have.

Indonesia’s Minister of Tourism, Arief Yahya, has urged hotels in Bali to give a 100-per cent discount to tourists in case Mount Agung erupts during their stay on the Island.

But numbers say that there has been at least a 20-per cent drop in tourism bookings since the volcano started to show increased signs of activity in the third week of September. Altogether, some 70,000 travelers have canceled or are expected to cancel their trips to Bali between October and November this year because of the looming eruption threat, estimates the Bali Hotel and Restaurant Association.

Some airlines have offered customers refunds if they choose to cancel their holidays to the area. Other airlines have been carrying extra fuel in case they need to turn around or divert. Officials in Indonesia have drawn up plans to divert planes to ten airports throughout the country in the event of an eruption.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Tour operators and tourism officials in Bali asked tourists to stay because they had “nothing to fear” from a possible volcanic eruption of Mount Agung in the northeast of the island which could, according to geologists, happen at any time. The emergency status for Bali’s rumbling and smoking volcano has just been extended until October 26 as Mount Agung remains on the highest alert level.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Tour operators and tourism officials in Bali asked tourists to stay because they had “nothing to fear” from a possible volcanic eruption of Mount Agung in the northeast of the island which could, according to geologists, happen at any time. The emergency status for Bali’s rumbling and smoking volcano has just been extended until October 26 as Mount Agung remains on the highest alert level.

However, the Bali Tourism Board insists that Bali was still a place safe for visits since 98 per cent of the island were out of the 12-kilometer danger zone around the volcano’s crater and wouldn’t be affected. That is, as long a volcanic ash cloud does not blow towards touristic centers or the airport, which would temporarily shut down air traffic.

While three major tourist spots have felt an impact by increased seismic activity so far, namely Besakih Temple, Tulamben beach and Tirta Gangga, other popular holiday destinations including Sanur, Kuta, Nusa Dua and Ubud would not be affected, the board said.

Instead, Bali’s tourism officials said visitors with bookings are invited to come to the island anyhow, and they, together with tour operators, have started  a promotion campaign on Twitter under #IaminBaliNOW to ease fears visitors might have.

Indonesia’s Minister of Tourism, Arief Yahya, has urged hotels in Bali to give a 100-per cent discount to tourists in case Mount Agung erupts during their stay on the Island.

But numbers say that there has been at least a 20-per cent drop in tourism bookings since the volcano started to show increased signs of activity in the third week of September. Altogether, some 70,000 travelers have canceled or are expected to cancel their trips to Bali between October and November this year because of the looming eruption threat, estimates the Bali Hotel and Restaurant Association.

Some airlines have offered customers refunds if they choose to cancel their holidays to the area. Other airlines have been carrying extra fuel in case they need to turn around or divert. Officials in Indonesia have drawn up plans to divert planes to ten airports throughout the country in the event of an eruption.

Do you like this post?
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