Bangkok’s taxi driver line up for protests

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Bangkok taxi1After Red Shirts, Yellow Shirts, White Masks, People’s Army, rice farmers and rubber farmers, Bangkok’s taxi drivers are the next to stage a rally in these eventful times in Thailand nowadays.

The Network of Taxi Operators has originally said it will organise a rally on August 26 at the Royal Plaza in Bangkok to demand remedial measures from the government when the price of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in the transport sector is floated at the beginning of September. However, there will be talks held on August 29 and the taxi drivers have decided to call off any gathering to wait for the result before making further moves.

LPG is the fuel almost all taxis thankfully use in Bangkok. It is heavily subsidised by the government and sells at around 18 baht per kilogramme, while 1 liter of several sorts of petrol costs between 37 and 43 baht.

LPG is also much cheaper Thailand than in neighbouring countries. The price in Laos is equivalent to 40 baht per kilogramme, while in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia it is 37, 41 and 19 baht, respectively.

The Thai government said it needs to float the price for LPG to reduce the financial burden of the state-owned oil fund in fuel subsidies. The cabinet had agreed to increase the LPG price by 0.50 baht per kilogramme monthly over 12 months, starting from September 1, until it has reached 24 baht.

The protesters requested the government help carry the burden or provide other assistances, saying the taxi fare has remained at the same rate for 5 consecutive years, while prices of gas have gone up from time to time; thus it is hard for taxi drivers to make ends meet.

“We do not want to oppose the plan to float the LPG price, but the government should come up with some remedial measures to help affected operators. For example, the government launched energy credit cards to help taxi drivers using natural gas for vehicles (NGV) so that they received a 2-baht discount per kilo,” a statement from the network said.

It will also ask the government to review its request, proposed two years ago, to increase the starting fare for all taxi rides from 35 baht to 40 baht.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

After Red Shirts, Yellow Shirts, White Masks, People’s Army, rice farmers and rubber farmers, Bangkok’s taxi drivers are the next to stage a rally in these eventful times in Thailand nowadays.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bangkok taxi1After Red Shirts, Yellow Shirts, White Masks, People’s Army, rice farmers and rubber farmers, Bangkok’s taxi drivers are the next to stage a rally in these eventful times in Thailand nowadays.

The Network of Taxi Operators has originally said it will organise a rally on August 26 at the Royal Plaza in Bangkok to demand remedial measures from the government when the price of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in the transport sector is floated at the beginning of September. However, there will be talks held on August 29 and the taxi drivers have decided to call off any gathering to wait for the result before making further moves.

LPG is the fuel almost all taxis thankfully use in Bangkok. It is heavily subsidised by the government and sells at around 18 baht per kilogramme, while 1 liter of several sorts of petrol costs between 37 and 43 baht.

LPG is also much cheaper Thailand than in neighbouring countries. The price in Laos is equivalent to 40 baht per kilogramme, while in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia it is 37, 41 and 19 baht, respectively.

The Thai government said it needs to float the price for LPG to reduce the financial burden of the state-owned oil fund in fuel subsidies. The cabinet had agreed to increase the LPG price by 0.50 baht per kilogramme monthly over 12 months, starting from September 1, until it has reached 24 baht.

The protesters requested the government help carry the burden or provide other assistances, saying the taxi fare has remained at the same rate for 5 consecutive years, while prices of gas have gone up from time to time; thus it is hard for taxi drivers to make ends meet.

“We do not want to oppose the plan to float the LPG price, but the government should come up with some remedial measures to help affected operators. For example, the government launched energy credit cards to help taxi drivers using natural gas for vehicles (NGV) so that they received a 2-baht discount per kilo,” a statement from the network said.

It will also ask the government to review its request, proposed two years ago, to increase the starting fare for all taxi rides from 35 baht to 40 baht.

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