Beijing to deploy nuclear power plants in South China Sea

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South China Sea lighthouse
Lighthouses such as those on an artificial island built by Beijing in the South China Sea could be powered by swimming nuclear energy platforms

China has set up plans to construct “maritime nuclear power platforms” that could be used to support its projects in the disputed South China Sea, state-run Chinese newspaper Global Times reported on April 22.

The “swimming” platforms could “sail” to remote areas and provide a stable power supply, the paper noted. The project to design and construct the platforms has been given to China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation, whose general office’s head Liu Zhengguo told the paper that the company is “pushing forward the work.” A demonstration platform is expected to be completed by 2018 and put into service by the next year.

“The development of nuclear power platforms is a burgeoning trend. The exact number of plants to be built depends on the market demand,” which is “pretty strong,” Liu said, adding that “given the long distance to the Chinese mainland and the changing weather and oceanic conditions, transporting fuel could be an issue, which is why developing maritime nuclear power platforms is of great significance.”

The platforms could provide power for lighthouses, search and rescue equipment, defense facilities, airports and harbours in the South China Sea.

China in the recent past has been heating up tension in the area parts of which are also claimed by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam in a region through which about $5 trillion in trade is shipped every year and which is believed to have huge deposits of oil and gas.

China has been carrying out construction activities on the artificial islands it has built in the sea. It recently started operation of a lighthouse that it claimed will be used for navigation services. Beijing claimed all the projects are for civilian purposes. Earlier this month, Chinese military aircraft landed on one of the man-made islands, followed by massive military drills resembling actual combat conditions.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Lighthouses such as those on an artificial island built by Beijing in the South China Sea could be powered by swimming nuclear energy platforms

China has set up plans to construct “maritime nuclear power platforms” that could be used to support its projects in the disputed South China Sea, state-run Chinese newspaper Global Times reported on April 22.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

South China Sea lighthouse
Lighthouses such as those on an artificial island built by Beijing in the South China Sea could be powered by swimming nuclear energy platforms

China has set up plans to construct “maritime nuclear power platforms” that could be used to support its projects in the disputed South China Sea, state-run Chinese newspaper Global Times reported on April 22.

The “swimming” platforms could “sail” to remote areas and provide a stable power supply, the paper noted. The project to design and construct the platforms has been given to China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation, whose general office’s head Liu Zhengguo told the paper that the company is “pushing forward the work.” A demonstration platform is expected to be completed by 2018 and put into service by the next year.

“The development of nuclear power platforms is a burgeoning trend. The exact number of plants to be built depends on the market demand,” which is “pretty strong,” Liu said, adding that “given the long distance to the Chinese mainland and the changing weather and oceanic conditions, transporting fuel could be an issue, which is why developing maritime nuclear power platforms is of great significance.”

The platforms could provide power for lighthouses, search and rescue equipment, defense facilities, airports and harbours in the South China Sea.

China in the recent past has been heating up tension in the area parts of which are also claimed by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam in a region through which about $5 trillion in trade is shipped every year and which is believed to have huge deposits of oil and gas.

China has been carrying out construction activities on the artificial islands it has built in the sea. It recently started operation of a lighthouse that it claimed will be used for navigation services. Beijing claimed all the projects are for civilian purposes. Earlier this month, Chinese military aircraft landed on one of the man-made islands, followed by massive military drills resembling actual combat conditions.

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