Bongbong, Imelda warming up for Philippine elections

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Imelda Marcos bigImelda Marcos and her son Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. are noticeably warming up in the run-up to next year’s Philippine elections. Now that incumbent President Benigno Aquino III’s choice for his succession has been made clear – he endorsed interior minister Manuel Roxas as top candidate of the Liberal Party and next leader -, the Marcoses start firing.

Imelda, who still holds a political post as Representative for Ilocos Norte, a province in the northeast of Luzon Island which has historically been a stronghold of the Marcos clan, has always been vocal about her dream to see her son, who is member of the center-right Nacionalista Party and since 2010 sits as Senator in the Congress, become president or at least take on a top role in the government, but did so far not officially confirm that he will be running. Candidates have to until October 16 to register for the May 2016 polls.

“I think he has a lot of good potential. If it will be his destiny and it will be the people’s choice, I think he has enough experience,” the former first lady of the Philippines said, which still is under scrutiny for ill-gotten wealth accumulated during the era from 1966 to 1986 when her husband Ferdinand Marcos ran the country like a self-service store for himself, his family and his loyal circles. But there is still sizeable support for the Marcoses, as, for example, a Facebook campaign called “Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos for President 2016” shows.

“Bongbong”, however, said he has yet to decide if he’s seeking a higher office. Talks are that he would run in tandem with Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, and he was also considered by the United Nationalist Alliance to be the running mate in incumbent Vice President Jejomar Binay’s presidential bid, but the latter seems to be a bit of a troublesome pairing. Binay, in the 1980s, represented the victims of human rights abuses perpetrated during the rule of Ferdinand Marcos, and was a close ally of Aquino’s late mother, democracy icon Corazon Aquino who took over power from the dictator in 1986.

Bongbong Facebook
Facebook campaign for “Bongbong”

A few days ago, “Bongbong” delivered his own “speech to the nation” at a business meeting, resembling President Benigno Aquino’s recent “State of the Nation Address”.

“My vision of our country is one that can overcome its economic and social challenges by drawing on our own strengths and drawing on our unity,” Marcos Jr. said at the Asia CEO Talks held in Pasay City on July 29, two days after President Benigno Aquino III delivered his final speech.

Marcos said “business should take the lead in nation building” and “government should help business do business.” He said this was the best way to create jobs, distribute the country’s wealth and stop of the exodus of Filipino workers.

“It is perhaps understandable if many doubt whether the government actually has the ability to do that because recent problems have revealed shortcomings in our efforts to eliminate corruption,” he said.

He further said he will adopt a gross income tax policy for businesses, and demanded the Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) law be amended.

“There is great promise if we can actually get the system to implement large national PPP projects, where we can transfer the costs of capital to the private sector and even the financial risks to the private sector, whilst giving the private sector the chance to gain profit,” Marcos Jr. said.

He also criticised Aquino’s rosy picture made about the manufacturing industry.

“I’m still trying to find out where that vibrant manufacturing sector exists. We don’t make anything anymore,” he said.

Bongbong Imelda“Aquino not nice”

Imelda Marcos, quite naturally, is also on bad terms with Benigno Aquino III, complaining in a recent interview that the President had “not been nice” to her family and she hoped that “the Filipino people would be wiser” in choosing their next president.

In 1983, during the last years of Ferdinand Marcos’s administration, President Aquino’s father, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr., the leader of the opposition to the then Marcos government, was assassinated.

Imelda and her whole family are still subject of a government’s civil forfeiture case which tries to recover money and valuables channeled off public coffers during their time in power. When they were ousted in a “People Power” revolution led by Corazon Aquino in 1986, Philippine investigators estimated their wealth at about $10 billion, stashed away in secret bank deposits around the world and hidden by relatives and cronies. By now, almost 30 years later, just $4 billion have been accounted for.

According to Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s latest mandatory filing of his statement of assets, liabilities and net worth for 2013, he is the richest senator with a (declared) wealth of 442 million pesos ($9.7 million).

 

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Reading Time: 3 minutes

Imelda Marcos and her son Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. are noticeably warming up in the run-up to next year’s Philippine elections. Now that incumbent President Benigno Aquino III’s choice for his succession has been made clear – he endorsed interior minister Manuel Roxas as top candidate of the Liberal Party and next leader -, the Marcoses start firing.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Imelda Marcos bigImelda Marcos and her son Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. are noticeably warming up in the run-up to next year’s Philippine elections. Now that incumbent President Benigno Aquino III’s choice for his succession has been made clear – he endorsed interior minister Manuel Roxas as top candidate of the Liberal Party and next leader -, the Marcoses start firing.

Imelda, who still holds a political post as Representative for Ilocos Norte, a province in the northeast of Luzon Island which has historically been a stronghold of the Marcos clan, has always been vocal about her dream to see her son, who is member of the center-right Nacionalista Party and since 2010 sits as Senator in the Congress, become president or at least take on a top role in the government, but did so far not officially confirm that he will be running. Candidates have to until October 16 to register for the May 2016 polls.

“I think he has a lot of good potential. If it will be his destiny and it will be the people’s choice, I think he has enough experience,” the former first lady of the Philippines said, which still is under scrutiny for ill-gotten wealth accumulated during the era from 1966 to 1986 when her husband Ferdinand Marcos ran the country like a self-service store for himself, his family and his loyal circles. But there is still sizeable support for the Marcoses, as, for example, a Facebook campaign called “Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos for President 2016” shows.

“Bongbong”, however, said he has yet to decide if he’s seeking a higher office. Talks are that he would run in tandem with Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, and he was also considered by the United Nationalist Alliance to be the running mate in incumbent Vice President Jejomar Binay’s presidential bid, but the latter seems to be a bit of a troublesome pairing. Binay, in the 1980s, represented the victims of human rights abuses perpetrated during the rule of Ferdinand Marcos, and was a close ally of Aquino’s late mother, democracy icon Corazon Aquino who took over power from the dictator in 1986.

Bongbong Facebook
Facebook campaign for “Bongbong”

A few days ago, “Bongbong” delivered his own “speech to the nation” at a business meeting, resembling President Benigno Aquino’s recent “State of the Nation Address”.

“My vision of our country is one that can overcome its economic and social challenges by drawing on our own strengths and drawing on our unity,” Marcos Jr. said at the Asia CEO Talks held in Pasay City on July 29, two days after President Benigno Aquino III delivered his final speech.

Marcos said “business should take the lead in nation building” and “government should help business do business.” He said this was the best way to create jobs, distribute the country’s wealth and stop of the exodus of Filipino workers.

“It is perhaps understandable if many doubt whether the government actually has the ability to do that because recent problems have revealed shortcomings in our efforts to eliminate corruption,” he said.

He further said he will adopt a gross income tax policy for businesses, and demanded the Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) law be amended.

“There is great promise if we can actually get the system to implement large national PPP projects, where we can transfer the costs of capital to the private sector and even the financial risks to the private sector, whilst giving the private sector the chance to gain profit,” Marcos Jr. said.

He also criticised Aquino’s rosy picture made about the manufacturing industry.

“I’m still trying to find out where that vibrant manufacturing sector exists. We don’t make anything anymore,” he said.

Bongbong Imelda“Aquino not nice”

Imelda Marcos, quite naturally, is also on bad terms with Benigno Aquino III, complaining in a recent interview that the President had “not been nice” to her family and she hoped that “the Filipino people would be wiser” in choosing their next president.

In 1983, during the last years of Ferdinand Marcos’s administration, President Aquino’s father, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr., the leader of the opposition to the then Marcos government, was assassinated.

Imelda and her whole family are still subject of a government’s civil forfeiture case which tries to recover money and valuables channeled off public coffers during their time in power. When they were ousted in a “People Power” revolution led by Corazon Aquino in 1986, Philippine investigators estimated their wealth at about $10 billion, stashed away in secret bank deposits around the world and hidden by relatives and cronies. By now, almost 30 years later, just $4 billion have been accounted for.

According to Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s latest mandatory filing of his statement of assets, liabilities and net worth for 2013, he is the richest senator with a (declared) wealth of 442 million pesos ($9.7 million).

 

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