Bongbong Marcos counts on dad’s legacy in election bid (video)

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Young Bongbong in UK
UK-educated Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr in his youth

Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr, son of late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos, in his first public comments since announcing on October 5 he would run as an independent in the Philippine general election coming May said his father’s legacy would “help rather than hamper” his own bid for the vice presidency and that his surname was the “greatest blessing.”

“I am the luckiest person that I know,” Bongbong said a at press conference. “Being a Marcos is part of that. I am very happy of being born into the Marcos family.”

He added that voters would not be swayed by allegations against his father who was accused of massive human rights abuses and embezzling at least $10 billion from public coffers during his two decades in power ended by a famous 1986 military-backed “people power” revolution.

The Marcos family was forced into exile in Hawaii in 1986 and Marcos Sr died there in 1989.  His wife, Imelda, Philippine First Lady from 1965 to 1986, despite being 86 years of age continues to be influential in Philippine politics and currently holds the office of Member of the Philippine House of Representatives in her home district Ilocos Norte.

Activists recorded that at least 882 people went missing during the period of martial law declared by the dictator. Marcos Sr is also suspected of having orchestrated the assassination his long-time political opponent Benigno Aquino, Jr., father of incumbent President Benigno Aquino III, in 1983.

Bongbong Marcos
Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr today

“If you talk to people, they are not concerned about that,” Bongbong said.

“Filipinos are more worried about poverty, crime and lack of basic infrastructure, which had made commuting in the capital a daily misery for millions,” he added.

A “lack of leadership” under President Benigno Aquino III had exacerbated these woes, he argued. “This is what people are worried about and this is what I will address.”

“What happened in 1986 happened already. These things have already been decided.”

He added that historians would judge his father’s rule and voters today wanted good public servants.

More than 54 million Filipinos will vote for a new president, vice president and about 18,000 lawmakers and local government officials in the May elections. The most recent poll from one of the country’s major research firms showed Bongbong Marcos running third in the vice presidential race, with 13 per cent saying they would vote for him. He, however, has yet to find a running mate.

Meanwhile, Bongbong’s mother Imelda has expressed “disappointment” that her son has set his sights just on winning the vice presidency, wishing instead he would follow his father’s footsteps into the presidential palace.

“My mother wanted me to become president since I was three years old. Imagine how disappointed she is,” Bongbong said. “But the time is just not right to run for president.”

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

UK-educated Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr in his youth

Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr, son of late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos, in his first public comments since announcing on October 5 he would run as an independent in the Philippine general election coming May said his father’s legacy would “help rather than hamper” his own bid for the vice presidency and that his surname was the “greatest blessing.”

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Young Bongbong in UK
UK-educated Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr in his youth

Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr, son of late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos, in his first public comments since announcing on October 5 he would run as an independent in the Philippine general election coming May said his father’s legacy would “help rather than hamper” his own bid for the vice presidency and that his surname was the “greatest blessing.”

“I am the luckiest person that I know,” Bongbong said a at press conference. “Being a Marcos is part of that. I am very happy of being born into the Marcos family.”

He added that voters would not be swayed by allegations against his father who was accused of massive human rights abuses and embezzling at least $10 billion from public coffers during his two decades in power ended by a famous 1986 military-backed “people power” revolution.

The Marcos family was forced into exile in Hawaii in 1986 and Marcos Sr died there in 1989.  His wife, Imelda, Philippine First Lady from 1965 to 1986, despite being 86 years of age continues to be influential in Philippine politics and currently holds the office of Member of the Philippine House of Representatives in her home district Ilocos Norte.

Activists recorded that at least 882 people went missing during the period of martial law declared by the dictator. Marcos Sr is also suspected of having orchestrated the assassination his long-time political opponent Benigno Aquino, Jr., father of incumbent President Benigno Aquino III, in 1983.

Bongbong Marcos
Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr today

“If you talk to people, they are not concerned about that,” Bongbong said.

“Filipinos are more worried about poverty, crime and lack of basic infrastructure, which had made commuting in the capital a daily misery for millions,” he added.

A “lack of leadership” under President Benigno Aquino III had exacerbated these woes, he argued. “This is what people are worried about and this is what I will address.”

“What happened in 1986 happened already. These things have already been decided.”

He added that historians would judge his father’s rule and voters today wanted good public servants.

More than 54 million Filipinos will vote for a new president, vice president and about 18,000 lawmakers and local government officials in the May elections. The most recent poll from one of the country’s major research firms showed Bongbong Marcos running third in the vice presidential race, with 13 per cent saying they would vote for him. He, however, has yet to find a running mate.

Meanwhile, Bongbong’s mother Imelda has expressed “disappointment” that her son has set his sights just on winning the vice presidency, wishing instead he would follow his father’s footsteps into the presidential palace.

“My mother wanted me to become president since I was three years old. Imagine how disappointed she is,” Bongbong said. “But the time is just not right to run for president.”

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