Boracay to lose $55.3m on sanctions

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Deserted beach on Boracay Island

Hotels and resorts on the Philippine tourist hotspot of Boracay Island have reported a wave of cancellations related to recent sanctions imposed by Taiwan over the death of a fisherman at open seas.

Estimated losses for Taiwanese tourists to the island amount to $55.3 million, or $600 per lost Taiwanese traveler, assuming revenue from chartered flights and tours is fully generated there.

Unfortunately for Boracay, Taiwan is the second largest source of tourists just behind South Korea, according to the Philippine Department of Tourism (DOT).

In 2012, the DOT said 92,209 tourists from Taiwan went to Boracay, with 156,445 coming from South Korea, and 82,358 from China.

Henry Chusuey, chair of the Boracay Foundation Inc., told the Philippine Inquirer that chartered flights and group tours had been cancelled, along with 100 rooms from the hotel group.

The pressure being felt in Boracay comes just five days after Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou followed through with threats to issue a red alert for tourism to discourage travel to the Philippines.

The horizon continues to look bleak for Boracay, as Taiwanese both young and old have taken to venting their ire on social media, backing up their government’s tough stance.

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Deserted beach on Boracay Island

Hotels and resorts on the Philippine tourist hotspot of Boracay Island have reported a wave of cancellations related to recent sanctions imposed by Taiwan over the death of a fisherman at open seas.

Reading Time: 1 minute

boracay-philippines
Deserted beach on Boracay Island

Hotels and resorts on the Philippine tourist hotspot of Boracay Island have reported a wave of cancellations related to recent sanctions imposed by Taiwan over the death of a fisherman at open seas.

Estimated losses for Taiwanese tourists to the island amount to $55.3 million, or $600 per lost Taiwanese traveler, assuming revenue from chartered flights and tours is fully generated there.

Unfortunately for Boracay, Taiwan is the second largest source of tourists just behind South Korea, according to the Philippine Department of Tourism (DOT).

In 2012, the DOT said 92,209 tourists from Taiwan went to Boracay, with 156,445 coming from South Korea, and 82,358 from China.

Henry Chusuey, chair of the Boracay Foundation Inc., told the Philippine Inquirer that chartered flights and group tours had been cancelled, along with 100 rooms from the hotel group.

The pressure being felt in Boracay comes just five days after Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou followed through with threats to issue a red alert for tourism to discourage travel to the Philippines.

The horizon continues to look bleak for Boracay, as Taiwanese both young and old have taken to venting their ire on social media, backing up their government’s tough stance.

 

 

 

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