Cambodia bans use of the term ‘tuk tuk’

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Tuk Tuk
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The Cambodian tourism ministry has banned motor rickshaw drivers in the country and especially in the capital Phnom Penh from using the term “tuk tuk” for their vehicle when approaching tourists as a “disciplinary measure”, according to a document published at the ministry’s website.

The circular, signed by tourism minister Thong Khon, finds that there was a “misuse” of the term tuk tuk, and motor rickshaws and motor trailers should henceforth be called “reumork”, the Khmer word for tricycle that “has been used for ages” in the country.

It is understood that tourist also are politely asked not to use the word tuk tuk anymore. The circular was distributed to all tour operators. travel agents and tour guides, hotel, restaurants and bar associations, as well as to all provincial and municipal authorities in the country. However, there is no mentioning of a fine in the case the word tuk tuk is accidentally used.

Reumork or reu mork is indeed a traditional Khmer term for motor rickshaw which are typically tricycles in Cambodia. Tuk tuk, on the other hand, is, so to say, a foreign word. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the earliest recorded texts using the term refer to 3-wheeled taxis used in Thailand. It’s an onomatopoetic word that imitates the noise of the vehicle’s engine.

The vehicles known as tuk tuk originated in Japan and were built by Daihatsu. It was Thailand that subsequently went into production some 50 years ago, and they evolved as a motorised relative of the rickshaw. The single stroke motor powering the first 3-wheelers had a distinctive hum when operating, and the “tuk tuk” sound became familiar to many in need of quick and convenient transportation in Bangkok.

The reumork, instead, has been a variant in the form of a tricycle, whereby a normal motorbike was connected to a two-wheel trailer. See our gallery for examples.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Click to enlarge

The Cambodian tourism ministry has banned motor rickshaw drivers in the country and especially in the capital Phnom Penh from using the term “tuk tuk” for their vehicle when approaching tourists as a “disciplinary measure”, according to a document published at the ministry’s website.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Tuk Tuk
Click to enlarge

The Cambodian tourism ministry has banned motor rickshaw drivers in the country and especially in the capital Phnom Penh from using the term “tuk tuk” for their vehicle when approaching tourists as a “disciplinary measure”, according to a document published at the ministry’s website.

The circular, signed by tourism minister Thong Khon, finds that there was a “misuse” of the term tuk tuk, and motor rickshaws and motor trailers should henceforth be called “reumork”, the Khmer word for tricycle that “has been used for ages” in the country.

It is understood that tourist also are politely asked not to use the word tuk tuk anymore. The circular was distributed to all tour operators. travel agents and tour guides, hotel, restaurants and bar associations, as well as to all provincial and municipal authorities in the country. However, there is no mentioning of a fine in the case the word tuk tuk is accidentally used.

Reumork or reu mork is indeed a traditional Khmer term for motor rickshaw which are typically tricycles in Cambodia. Tuk tuk, on the other hand, is, so to say, a foreign word. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the earliest recorded texts using the term refer to 3-wheeled taxis used in Thailand. It’s an onomatopoetic word that imitates the noise of the vehicle’s engine.

The vehicles known as tuk tuk originated in Japan and were built by Daihatsu. It was Thailand that subsequently went into production some 50 years ago, and they evolved as a motorised relative of the rickshaw. The single stroke motor powering the first 3-wheelers had a distinctive hum when operating, and the “tuk tuk” sound became familiar to many in need of quick and convenient transportation in Bangkok.

The reumork, instead, has been a variant in the form of a tricycle, whereby a normal motorbike was connected to a two-wheel trailer. See our gallery for examples.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
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  • Sad
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  • Bored
  • Afraid