Cambodia prepares for July 28 elections

Reading Time: 1 minute
Hun Sen and wife
Cambodia’s prime minister Hun Sen and his wife Bun Rany

Political parties in Cambodia have officially started campaigning for the July 28 general elections. Eight parties are taking part in the polls to elect 123 lawmakers to the lower house of parliament. The winner will form a new government to run Cambodia for the next five years.

Prime minister Hun Sen’s ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) is widely expected to win the polls in a landslide. Sen has run Cambodia since 1985 with little tolerance for opposition. The main opposition party’s leader, Sam Rainsy, is in self-imposed exile in France to avoid 12 years in prison for convictions widely seen as politically motivated.

Some 9.6 million people are registered to vote under the eyes of more than 7,700 domestic and international observers.

Hun Sen is seen by many as a controversial figure due to his political past. He came to power with the Khmer Rouge and served as an army commander during the regime. In 1977, he deserted and fled to Vietnam, where he became one of the leaders of the rebel army supported by the Vietnamese government that subsequently overthrew the Khmer Rouge. Hun Sen then became deputy prime minister of the Vietnamese-installed People’s Republic of Kampuchea in 1979 and prime minister in 1985.

He has been accused of suppressing political opponents and being a Vietnamese “puppet” and was also involved in a number of corruption cases. However, during his government the nation recovered from the Khmer Rouge atrocities and reached, at least since 1999, a sizeable GDP growth as progress was made on economic reforms. GDP growth was 6.2 per cent in 2012 and 7 per cent in 2011.

Strongly criticised by the US and press freedom groups, the Cambodian government on June 25 decided to ban radio stations from carrying foreign-produced programmes in local Khmer language during the election campaign, but reversed the ban a few days later.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

[caption id="attachment_11598" align="alignleft" width="300"] Cambodia's prime minister Hun Sen and his wife Bun Rany[/caption] Political parties in Cambodia have officially started campaigning for the July 28 general elections. Eight parties are taking part in the polls to elect 123 lawmakers to the lower house of parliament. The winner will form a new government to run Cambodia for the next five years. Prime minister Hun Sen's ruling Cambodian People's Party (CPP) is widely expected to win the polls in a landslide. Sen has run Cambodia since 1985 with little tolerance for opposition. The main opposition party's leader, Sam Rainsy, is in...

Reading Time: 1 minute

Hun Sen and wife
Cambodia’s prime minister Hun Sen and his wife Bun Rany

Political parties in Cambodia have officially started campaigning for the July 28 general elections. Eight parties are taking part in the polls to elect 123 lawmakers to the lower house of parliament. The winner will form a new government to run Cambodia for the next five years.

Prime minister Hun Sen’s ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) is widely expected to win the polls in a landslide. Sen has run Cambodia since 1985 with little tolerance for opposition. The main opposition party’s leader, Sam Rainsy, is in self-imposed exile in France to avoid 12 years in prison for convictions widely seen as politically motivated.

Some 9.6 million people are registered to vote under the eyes of more than 7,700 domestic and international observers.

Hun Sen is seen by many as a controversial figure due to his political past. He came to power with the Khmer Rouge and served as an army commander during the regime. In 1977, he deserted and fled to Vietnam, where he became one of the leaders of the rebel army supported by the Vietnamese government that subsequently overthrew the Khmer Rouge. Hun Sen then became deputy prime minister of the Vietnamese-installed People’s Republic of Kampuchea in 1979 and prime minister in 1985.

He has been accused of suppressing political opponents and being a Vietnamese “puppet” and was also involved in a number of corruption cases. However, during his government the nation recovered from the Khmer Rouge atrocities and reached, at least since 1999, a sizeable GDP growth as progress was made on economic reforms. GDP growth was 6.2 per cent in 2012 and 7 per cent in 2011.

Strongly criticised by the US and press freedom groups, the Cambodian government on June 25 decided to ban radio stations from carrying foreign-produced programmes in local Khmer language during the election campaign, but reversed the ban a few days later.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid