Cambodia education major growth barrier

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education1The shortcomings of Cambodia’s education system, together with a high incidence of poverty, has created a ripe breeding ground for factories with neglectfully poor conditions that – if unimproved – will keep the nation below an economic glass ceiling.

Cambodians have poor access to post-secondary school level education, as well as kindergarten; vocational schools are equally hard to come by.

This void, long a focus of international charities and NGOs, will continue to keep Cambodia, as well as Bangladesh, at the bottom rung of the manufacturing-based economic model, with the country funneling mostly unskilled labour towards the production of garments, shoes and low-tech hand me downs from China.

Local experts project that this gap could take as much as two generations to fill. The current situation tells just why.

While 80 per cent of Cambodians attend primary school, only 32 per cent continue on to secondary, Room to Read, an NGO focused on international education, said.

With an estimated one-third of the population living below the national poverty line ($0.60 per day), many children are forced by their parents to leave school early to work as farm hands, factory workers or in more desperate trades, such as begging or prostitution.

According to Room to Read, the children most disproportionately affected are girls, who trade their education for a factory job where they are exposed to dangerous working conditions, currently a topic streaming across international headlines.

In rural Cambodia, about half of young girls are forced into labour to support their families instead of staying in school. The alarming result is that while half of all young girls work, only one third of boys abandon their education, making ratios of girls to boys in school 1:3. Cultural norms also come into play, as girls are considered less suitable for marriage if they acquire a higher education.

Major issues the Cambodian education systems faces is low pay for teachers, poor facilities and a weak education system in general.

When the despotic Pol Pot took over the country in 1975, he declared it “Year Zero,” sending out the Khmer Rouge to massacre the educated population and those who wore glasses in an attempt to create a perfect agrarian society. The genocide that wiped over half of the population out also destroyed the country’s educational system, along with any supporting institutions.

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The shortcomings of Cambodia’s education system, together with a high incidence of poverty, has created a ripe breeding ground for factories with neglectfully poor conditions that – if unimproved – will keep the nation below an economic glass ceiling.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

education1The shortcomings of Cambodia’s education system, together with a high incidence of poverty, has created a ripe breeding ground for factories with neglectfully poor conditions that – if unimproved – will keep the nation below an economic glass ceiling.

Cambodians have poor access to post-secondary school level education, as well as kindergarten; vocational schools are equally hard to come by.

This void, long a focus of international charities and NGOs, will continue to keep Cambodia, as well as Bangladesh, at the bottom rung of the manufacturing-based economic model, with the country funneling mostly unskilled labour towards the production of garments, shoes and low-tech hand me downs from China.

Local experts project that this gap could take as much as two generations to fill. The current situation tells just why.

While 80 per cent of Cambodians attend primary school, only 32 per cent continue on to secondary, Room to Read, an NGO focused on international education, said.

With an estimated one-third of the population living below the national poverty line ($0.60 per day), many children are forced by their parents to leave school early to work as farm hands, factory workers or in more desperate trades, such as begging or prostitution.

According to Room to Read, the children most disproportionately affected are girls, who trade their education for a factory job where they are exposed to dangerous working conditions, currently a topic streaming across international headlines.

In rural Cambodia, about half of young girls are forced into labour to support their families instead of staying in school. The alarming result is that while half of all young girls work, only one third of boys abandon their education, making ratios of girls to boys in school 1:3. Cultural norms also come into play, as girls are considered less suitable for marriage if they acquire a higher education.

Major issues the Cambodian education systems faces is low pay for teachers, poor facilities and a weak education system in general.

When the despotic Pol Pot took over the country in 1975, he declared it “Year Zero,” sending out the Khmer Rouge to massacre the educated population and those who wore glasses in an attempt to create a perfect agrarian society. The genocide that wiped over half of the population out also destroyed the country’s educational system, along with any supporting institutions.

 

 

 

Do you like this post?
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