Cockfighting is a ‘way of life’ in the Philippines (video)

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cockfightFerdinand Magellan first introduced the blood sport to the Philippines in 1521. In the tournament, 2 roosters with comparable weight or height are thrown into a gladiator-like arena where they’re paired off to fight to the death.

With feathers ruffled and two-inch razors tied to their legs, the raging roosters dance and bounce off each other until they can’t go on any longer or their throat is ripped out.

The Philippines has a forum on the web called Sabong Cockfighting, a place where cockfight enthusiasts come to share tips and dwell in information pertaining to the ins and outs of cockfighting in the nation. With over 3 million posts and 32,000 members, the community is filled to the brim with threads ranging from “Anything and everything about chicken” to a doctors’ “forum for veterinary and medical chicken talk”; the site even has a market place where you can buy and sell game fowl.

So yes, there is market for cockfighting, and it’s one of the ways that people make their daily income in the Philippines.

“The job is based on reputation,” a chicken doctor told NBC. The surgeon spends his days at arenas, sewing up six to 10 battle wounded chickens a day, charging 200 pesos ($4.50) per chicken. You get your surgery free if your gamecock dies – but you don’t get a funeral; it ends up being feathered and thrown into stew.

There’s a sense of community surrounding cockfighting. Some events are held for funerals where a percentage of the money is given to the family of the deceased. Some even turn a profit, like Teody, who works as a driver and told NBC that he won 12,000 pesos ($280), which is more than what he normally makes in a month.

“I bought a washing machine,” Teody said. “And I kept a little for beer.”

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Ferdinand Magellan first introduced the blood sport to the Philippines in 1521. In the tournament, 2 roosters with comparable weight or height are thrown into a gladiator-like arena where they’re paired off to fight to the death.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

cockfightFerdinand Magellan first introduced the blood sport to the Philippines in 1521. In the tournament, 2 roosters with comparable weight or height are thrown into a gladiator-like arena where they’re paired off to fight to the death.

With feathers ruffled and two-inch razors tied to their legs, the raging roosters dance and bounce off each other until they can’t go on any longer or their throat is ripped out.

The Philippines has a forum on the web called Sabong Cockfighting, a place where cockfight enthusiasts come to share tips and dwell in information pertaining to the ins and outs of cockfighting in the nation. With over 3 million posts and 32,000 members, the community is filled to the brim with threads ranging from “Anything and everything about chicken” to a doctors’ “forum for veterinary and medical chicken talk”; the site even has a market place where you can buy and sell game fowl.

So yes, there is market for cockfighting, and it’s one of the ways that people make their daily income in the Philippines.

“The job is based on reputation,” a chicken doctor told NBC. The surgeon spends his days at arenas, sewing up six to 10 battle wounded chickens a day, charging 200 pesos ($4.50) per chicken. You get your surgery free if your gamecock dies – but you don’t get a funeral; it ends up being feathered and thrown into stew.

There’s a sense of community surrounding cockfighting. Some events are held for funerals where a percentage of the money is given to the family of the deceased. Some even turn a profit, like Teody, who works as a driver and told NBC that he won 12,000 pesos ($280), which is more than what he normally makes in a month.

“I bought a washing machine,” Teody said. “And I kept a little for beer.”

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