Condolences from all over Southeast Asia to France

Reading Time: 4 minutes
lepetitecambodge
Le Petit Cambodge, a Cambodian restaurant in Paris were 14 people died in the brutal terror attacks of November 13

Southeast Asian nations, including Brunei, expressed their condolences to France after the horrific attacks in Paris on November 13 amid preparations in many countries to step up security level ahead of important event and at frequented places an tourist sites.

In Thailand, which just experienced a bomb attack with Muslim background just three month ago, security personnel have been ordered to tighten measures at all key tourist attractions and border areas in Thailand following the attacks in Paris. The estimated 1,000 Thais living in Paris were safe, the Thai Foreign ministry said. Prime Minister Prayut Chan-ocha sent a message of condolence on behalf of the government and all Thai people to the French government, expressing sympathy to the families of those killed or injured in the attacks.

In Malaysia, police have been put on high alert and will be doubling security efforts in anticipation of next week’s ASEAN Summit. Inspector-General of Police Khalid Abu Bakar said all police branches and divisions have increased vigilance to ensure the country remains secure. He said police are reviewing the security arrangements for the summit to be held at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Center, which will see world leaders including Barack Obama, Vladimir Putin, Shinzo Abe and Xi Jinping, among others.

KL Tower
As a sign of sympathy by Malaysia, the Kuala Lumpur tower was set in France’s national colours after the Paris attacks

Malaysia’s Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said that authorities have not received any information on possible attacks ahead of the summit but urged members of the public to come forward with any information on militant threats.

“What happened in Paris can happen anywhere else if our readiness is not at optimum levels,” he said.

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razak condemned the attacks. Opposition leader Wan Azizah Wan Ismail said they were “barbaric and meant to instil fear and terror in the hearts of all”.

Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi added that Malaysia had “zero tolerance for terrorism, whether domestic or foreign.”

In Singapore, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, President Tony Tan and Foreign Affairs Minister Vivian Balakrishnan expressed their condolences.

“I am deeply saddened by the loss of so many innocent lives. This is an attack on our shared humanity,” Priem Minister Lee said, adding that Singapore “strongly condemns these heinous attacks.”

Vietnam’s President Truong Tan Sang, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and Deputy PM and Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh also expressed their condolences to France.

“Vietnam is shocked and strongly condemns the bloody attacks aimed at civilians on November 13 that have killed and wounded many people,” Binh said.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen also strongly condemned the attacks.

“I’m deeply shocked and saddened to learn about the barbaric attacks on Bataclan Theater and other places, including a Cambodian restaurant, in Paris, leaving hundreds of innocent people dead and injured,” he said in a condolence message sent to French President Francois Hollande.

“The government and people of Cambodia strongly condemn this abominable crime and hope that the criminals will face serious prosecution,” he added.

Bodies in the streets of Paris
Bodies litter the streets of Paris. The first gunman has been identified as Omar Ismail Mostefai, a 29-year-old French citizen of Algerian origin who is suspected to have been radicalised in Syria.

Philippine President Benigno Aquino III said that “the Philippines and its people stand in solidarity with the people of Paris and all of France, in this time of deepest sorrow and the gravest outrage against the perpetrators of these crimes.”

Aquino considered the attacks as “atrocities that demand a united voice from the world in condemnation and grief.”

As far as it is known, Filipinos were not among people who died in the terror attacks.

“We have not received word from the Philippines Embassy in Paris about Filipinos who were affected by what happened in France,” Foreign Affairs Spokesman Charles Jose said.

Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world as per population, also expressed disgust with the terror. President Joko Widodo said on his Twitter account that he felt “a deep sorrow for the victims of violence in Paris. Terrorism, whatever its form and reason, cannot be tolerated.”

Luhut Pandjaitan, the country’s Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs, added that the latest attack is a reminder that Indonesia must remain vigilant against similar threats. So far, there is no information yet on Indonesian casualties in the incident.

Brunei’s Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah also sent his condolences to the French President saying he was “deeply shocked and saddened” to learn of the deadly attacks, and that the government and people of Brunei condemn “these senseless acts of terrorism and stand by the people of France at this time of national grief and mourning”.

Brunei TimesNewspaper Brunei Times reported that all Bruneians living in Paris are safe. It, however, remains unclear why in its November 14 report on the tragic events it put the word terror in quotation marks.

Condolences from the governments of Laos and Myanmar were reportedly also sent to France but so far not officially reported.

Meanwhile, Singapore-based terrorism expert Prof Rohan Gunaratna said that the Paris attacks will contribute to a rise in Islamo­phobia in Europe.

He said that Europeans normally had a ­balanced sense of human rights and security, which would now be skewed by the bloodbath in the French capital.

“They may get harsh in their fight against terrorism,” said the International Center for Political Violence and Terrorism Research head at Nanyang Technological University.

One example of what could follow was the fire that – in the same night just shortly after the Paris attack – engulfed a refugee camp in Calais in northwestern France where around 6,000 migrants, mainly young men from Syria and North Africa, are waiting for passage to the UK.

Calais-refugee-camp-on-fire
Migrant camp in Calais, France, on fire shortly after the attacks

An anti-migrant group known as ‘The Angry of Calais’ posted videos of the burning migrant camp on Facebook, indicating that if some Europeans feel that their governments or the European Union as a whole are unable to manage the refugee crisis – which also allows radicalised elements to slip into Europe without being recognised as is apparently was the case in the Paris attack -, then they might take the law into their own hands.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Le Petit Cambodge, a Cambodian restaurant in Paris were 14 people died in the brutal terror attacks of November 13

Southeast Asian nations, including Brunei, expressed their condolences to France after the horrific attacks in Paris on November 13 amid preparations in many countries to step up security level ahead of important event and at frequented places an tourist sites.

Reading Time: 4 minutes

lepetitecambodge
Le Petit Cambodge, a Cambodian restaurant in Paris were 14 people died in the brutal terror attacks of November 13

Southeast Asian nations, including Brunei, expressed their condolences to France after the horrific attacks in Paris on November 13 amid preparations in many countries to step up security level ahead of important event and at frequented places an tourist sites.

In Thailand, which just experienced a bomb attack with Muslim background just three month ago, security personnel have been ordered to tighten measures at all key tourist attractions and border areas in Thailand following the attacks in Paris. The estimated 1,000 Thais living in Paris were safe, the Thai Foreign ministry said. Prime Minister Prayut Chan-ocha sent a message of condolence on behalf of the government and all Thai people to the French government, expressing sympathy to the families of those killed or injured in the attacks.

In Malaysia, police have been put on high alert and will be doubling security efforts in anticipation of next week’s ASEAN Summit. Inspector-General of Police Khalid Abu Bakar said all police branches and divisions have increased vigilance to ensure the country remains secure. He said police are reviewing the security arrangements for the summit to be held at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Center, which will see world leaders including Barack Obama, Vladimir Putin, Shinzo Abe and Xi Jinping, among others.

KL Tower
As a sign of sympathy by Malaysia, the Kuala Lumpur tower was set in France’s national colours after the Paris attacks

Malaysia’s Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said that authorities have not received any information on possible attacks ahead of the summit but urged members of the public to come forward with any information on militant threats.

“What happened in Paris can happen anywhere else if our readiness is not at optimum levels,” he said.

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razak condemned the attacks. Opposition leader Wan Azizah Wan Ismail said they were “barbaric and meant to instil fear and terror in the hearts of all”.

Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi added that Malaysia had “zero tolerance for terrorism, whether domestic or foreign.”

In Singapore, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, President Tony Tan and Foreign Affairs Minister Vivian Balakrishnan expressed their condolences.

“I am deeply saddened by the loss of so many innocent lives. This is an attack on our shared humanity,” Priem Minister Lee said, adding that Singapore “strongly condemns these heinous attacks.”

Vietnam’s President Truong Tan Sang, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and Deputy PM and Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh also expressed their condolences to France.

“Vietnam is shocked and strongly condemns the bloody attacks aimed at civilians on November 13 that have killed and wounded many people,” Binh said.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen also strongly condemned the attacks.

“I’m deeply shocked and saddened to learn about the barbaric attacks on Bataclan Theater and other places, including a Cambodian restaurant, in Paris, leaving hundreds of innocent people dead and injured,” he said in a condolence message sent to French President Francois Hollande.

“The government and people of Cambodia strongly condemn this abominable crime and hope that the criminals will face serious prosecution,” he added.

Bodies in the streets of Paris
Bodies litter the streets of Paris. The first gunman has been identified as Omar Ismail Mostefai, a 29-year-old French citizen of Algerian origin who is suspected to have been radicalised in Syria.

Philippine President Benigno Aquino III said that “the Philippines and its people stand in solidarity with the people of Paris and all of France, in this time of deepest sorrow and the gravest outrage against the perpetrators of these crimes.”

Aquino considered the attacks as “atrocities that demand a united voice from the world in condemnation and grief.”

As far as it is known, Filipinos were not among people who died in the terror attacks.

“We have not received word from the Philippines Embassy in Paris about Filipinos who were affected by what happened in France,” Foreign Affairs Spokesman Charles Jose said.

Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world as per population, also expressed disgust with the terror. President Joko Widodo said on his Twitter account that he felt “a deep sorrow for the victims of violence in Paris. Terrorism, whatever its form and reason, cannot be tolerated.”

Luhut Pandjaitan, the country’s Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs, added that the latest attack is a reminder that Indonesia must remain vigilant against similar threats. So far, there is no information yet on Indonesian casualties in the incident.

Brunei’s Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah also sent his condolences to the French President saying he was “deeply shocked and saddened” to learn of the deadly attacks, and that the government and people of Brunei condemn “these senseless acts of terrorism and stand by the people of France at this time of national grief and mourning”.

Brunei TimesNewspaper Brunei Times reported that all Bruneians living in Paris are safe. It, however, remains unclear why in its November 14 report on the tragic events it put the word terror in quotation marks.

Condolences from the governments of Laos and Myanmar were reportedly also sent to France but so far not officially reported.

Meanwhile, Singapore-based terrorism expert Prof Rohan Gunaratna said that the Paris attacks will contribute to a rise in Islamo­phobia in Europe.

He said that Europeans normally had a ­balanced sense of human rights and security, which would now be skewed by the bloodbath in the French capital.

“They may get harsh in their fight against terrorism,” said the International Center for Political Violence and Terrorism Research head at Nanyang Technological University.

One example of what could follow was the fire that – in the same night just shortly after the Paris attack – engulfed a refugee camp in Calais in northwestern France where around 6,000 migrants, mainly young men from Syria and North Africa, are waiting for passage to the UK.

Calais-refugee-camp-on-fire
Migrant camp in Calais, France, on fire shortly after the attacks

An anti-migrant group known as ‘The Angry of Calais’ posted videos of the burning migrant camp on Facebook, indicating that if some Europeans feel that their governments or the European Union as a whole are unable to manage the refugee crisis – which also allows radicalised elements to slip into Europe without being recognised as is apparently was the case in the Paris attack -, then they might take the law into their own hands.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid