Construction to start for Metro Manila’s first subway stations

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Construction To Start For Metro Manila’s First Subway StationsA consortium of Japanese and Filipino firms has bagged the contract to design and build the first three stations of the Metro Manila subway project (map here) and will commence construction on February 27.

The Department of Transportation said it signed the design and build contract for the stations and its partial operability section with a joint venture of Shimizu Corp., Fujita Corp., Takenaka Civil Engineering Co. Ltd. and EEI Corp., a leading Philippine engineering and construction firm which is part of the Yuchengko Group of Companies, one of the largest family-owned business conglomerates in the Philippines. 

The joint venture will build the stations Quirino Highway, Tandang Sora and North Avenue, tunnel structures, the Valenzuela Depot and the building and facilities for the new Philippine Railway Institute, the department said.

Partial operation of the subway along its first three stations is targeted for 2022, while full operation is planned for 2025.

When completed, the Metro Manila subway in its phase 1 will have 15 stations over 36 kilometers from the Quirino Highway/Mindanao Avenue crossing in Quezon City to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Paranaque City, which is expected to considerably ease traffic congestion in the mega city.

In its first year of full operations, the rail system is expected to serve up to 370,000 passengers per day, with a capacity of serving up to 1.5 million passengers daily at peak times. The entire subway will run on Japanese technology. 

Overall, this first phase, or Line 9, of the Philippines first-ever subway system will cost about $4.4 billion. It is partially funded by a $1-billion loan by the Japan International Cooperation Agency. With extensions at a later stage to the south to Cavite and to the north to Bulacan in phase 2 and 3, respectively, the construction of the line will cost $6.9 billion.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

A consortium of Japanese and Filipino firms has bagged the contract to design and build the first three stations of the Metro Manila subway project (map here) and will commence construction on February 27.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Construction To Start For Metro Manila’s First Subway StationsA consortium of Japanese and Filipino firms has bagged the contract to design and build the first three stations of the Metro Manila subway project (map here) and will commence construction on February 27.

The Department of Transportation said it signed the design and build contract for the stations and its partial operability section with a joint venture of Shimizu Corp., Fujita Corp., Takenaka Civil Engineering Co. Ltd. and EEI Corp., a leading Philippine engineering and construction firm which is part of the Yuchengko Group of Companies, one of the largest family-owned business conglomerates in the Philippines. 

The joint venture will build the stations Quirino Highway, Tandang Sora and North Avenue, tunnel structures, the Valenzuela Depot and the building and facilities for the new Philippine Railway Institute, the department said.

Partial operation of the subway along its first three stations is targeted for 2022, while full operation is planned for 2025.

When completed, the Metro Manila subway in its phase 1 will have 15 stations over 36 kilometers from the Quirino Highway/Mindanao Avenue crossing in Quezon City to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Paranaque City, which is expected to considerably ease traffic congestion in the mega city.

In its first year of full operations, the rail system is expected to serve up to 370,000 passengers per day, with a capacity of serving up to 1.5 million passengers daily at peak times. The entire subway will run on Japanese technology. 

Overall, this first phase, or Line 9, of the Philippines first-ever subway system will cost about $4.4 billion. It is partially funded by a $1-billion loan by the Japan International Cooperation Agency. With extensions at a later stage to the south to Cavite and to the north to Bulacan in phase 2 and 3, respectively, the construction of the line will cost $6.9 billion.

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