Dawei receives much-needed boost

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The Dawei project on the Andaman Sea coast got backing from the Myanmar and Thai governments

The Dawei deep-sea port and industrial zone project received support from Thai and Myanmar leaders on July 23 in an attempt to soften the setbacks the project has been suffering with securing private investment.

The much-needed boost for the $50 billion project given by Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and Myanmar President Thein Sein is the first time that the governments have directly worked together on what is meant to become Southeast Asia’s largest industrial complex. However, neither parties have quantified what level of support will be given.

Led by Thai construction giant Italian-Thai Development, the project – which is to include steel mills, refineries, a petrochemical complex and power plants – produced worrisome news when a local partner, the Max Myanmar conglomerate, confirmed that it would be pulling out on July 2.

During his trip to Thailand, President Thein Sein visited the Laem Chabang deep-sea port in Chon Buri, a potential connection to Dawei that would link the eastern Thai seaboard with Dawei on the Andaman Sea. Thailand is eagerly eyeing passage through Dawei because this will open trade routes to India via the Bay of Bengal.

The added attention Thailand has been giving to their neighbour is also being seen as a bid to maintain influence over the nominally civilian government in Naypyidaw, now experiencing a flood of interest from foreign investors.

Myanmar’s border trade rose by 58 per cent to $3.36 billion in the financial year ending in June, with the majority of deals being brokered with China, which accounted for a lion’s share of $2 billion. Thailand followed in second with India coming in third.

Six official Chinese delegations visited Myanmar last year to organise investments in infrastructure, mining, energy and manufacturing, according to the Myanmar Investment Commission.

Most of the China-Myanmar trade is done through the Muse trading zone on the Shweli River. Other points of contact exist across the border, such as in Shane state, while others are cut off due to ongoing rebel activity.

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Dawei project on the Andaman Sea coast got backing from the Myanmar and Thai governments

The Dawei deep-sea port and industrial zone project received support from Thai and Myanmar leaders on July 23 in an attempt to soften the setbacks the project has been suffering with securing private investment.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Dawei project on the Andaman Sea coast got backing from the Myanmar and Thai governments

The Dawei deep-sea port and industrial zone project received support from Thai and Myanmar leaders on July 23 in an attempt to soften the setbacks the project has been suffering with securing private investment.

The much-needed boost for the $50 billion project given by Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and Myanmar President Thein Sein is the first time that the governments have directly worked together on what is meant to become Southeast Asia’s largest industrial complex. However, neither parties have quantified what level of support will be given.

Led by Thai construction giant Italian-Thai Development, the project – which is to include steel mills, refineries, a petrochemical complex and power plants – produced worrisome news when a local partner, the Max Myanmar conglomerate, confirmed that it would be pulling out on July 2.

During his trip to Thailand, President Thein Sein visited the Laem Chabang deep-sea port in Chon Buri, a potential connection to Dawei that would link the eastern Thai seaboard with Dawei on the Andaman Sea. Thailand is eagerly eyeing passage through Dawei because this will open trade routes to India via the Bay of Bengal.

The added attention Thailand has been giving to their neighbour is also being seen as a bid to maintain influence over the nominally civilian government in Naypyidaw, now experiencing a flood of interest from foreign investors.

Myanmar’s border trade rose by 58 per cent to $3.36 billion in the financial year ending in June, with the majority of deals being brokered with China, which accounted for a lion’s share of $2 billion. Thailand followed in second with India coming in third.

Six official Chinese delegations visited Myanmar last year to organise investments in infrastructure, mining, energy and manufacturing, according to the Myanmar Investment Commission.

Most of the China-Myanmar trade is done through the Muse trading zone on the Shweli River. Other points of contact exist across the border, such as in Shane state, while others are cut off due to ongoing rebel activity.

 

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