Disaster in the Philippines: Japan never forgets

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typhoon japan aid“We will never forget what the Philippines did for us in 2011,” said Kenzo Iwakami of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (Jica), the team leader of the Japanese medical mission that is currently aiding the Philippines’ tsunami victims.

Japan sent a group of 25 medical workers and disaster relief experts to Manila on November 11, with the goal of helping the nation that bared its hand in helping Japan two years ago.

On March 11, 2011, Japan’s northeastern region suffered a 9-magnitude earthquake which triggered a tsunami, killing more than 15,000 people. Minister Akio Isomata of the Japanese Embassy in Manila said that as soon as the news broke of the disasters, the Department of Health sent out a team of Filipino doctors that provided emergency medical relief to the tsunami victims, even willing to counsel those who suffered shell shock from the disaster.

“We will never forget,” said Isomata.

Japan’s medical team is comprised of three doctors, seven nurses, two pharmacists, five medical coordinators and officials from the Japanese foreign minister and Jica.

“This time, we have to help you. Because two years ago, you helped us. So this time, this is our turn,” said Dr. Joji Tomioka, a sub leader and medical coordinator for Jica’s medical team for disaster relief.

“It’s an unbelievable calamity because as you know, we experienced this similar disaster in 2011. We’re very sorry about this,” Iwakami told reporters when he landed at Ninoy Aquino International Airport.

The team is scheduled to work on the ground for two weeks, bringing enough medical supplies and equipment to establish a medical facility.

“We brought some medications and equipment to make a field hospital,” Tomioka said.

Members of the group have had prior experience with search and rescue teams amongst previous natural disasters. Iwakami was there during the 2004 tsunami in Phuket, Thailand, while Tomioka has a handful of experience in worldwide medical missions where disasters arose.

Currently, according to the Department of Health, there are among 400 health workers from different countries right now aiding the Philippines. Japan is pledging $10 million in aid for disaster relief.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

“We will never forget what the Philippines did for us in 2011,” said Kenzo Iwakami of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (Jica), the team leader of the Japanese medical mission that is currently aiding the Philippines’ tsunami victims.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

typhoon japan aid“We will never forget what the Philippines did for us in 2011,” said Kenzo Iwakami of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (Jica), the team leader of the Japanese medical mission that is currently aiding the Philippines’ tsunami victims.

Japan sent a group of 25 medical workers and disaster relief experts to Manila on November 11, with the goal of helping the nation that bared its hand in helping Japan two years ago.

On March 11, 2011, Japan’s northeastern region suffered a 9-magnitude earthquake which triggered a tsunami, killing more than 15,000 people. Minister Akio Isomata of the Japanese Embassy in Manila said that as soon as the news broke of the disasters, the Department of Health sent out a team of Filipino doctors that provided emergency medical relief to the tsunami victims, even willing to counsel those who suffered shell shock from the disaster.

“We will never forget,” said Isomata.

Japan’s medical team is comprised of three doctors, seven nurses, two pharmacists, five medical coordinators and officials from the Japanese foreign minister and Jica.

“This time, we have to help you. Because two years ago, you helped us. So this time, this is our turn,” said Dr. Joji Tomioka, a sub leader and medical coordinator for Jica’s medical team for disaster relief.

“It’s an unbelievable calamity because as you know, we experienced this similar disaster in 2011. We’re very sorry about this,” Iwakami told reporters when he landed at Ninoy Aquino International Airport.

The team is scheduled to work on the ground for two weeks, bringing enough medical supplies and equipment to establish a medical facility.

“We brought some medications and equipment to make a field hospital,” Tomioka said.

Members of the group have had prior experience with search and rescue teams amongst previous natural disasters. Iwakami was there during the 2004 tsunami in Phuket, Thailand, while Tomioka has a handful of experience in worldwide medical missions where disasters arose.

Currently, according to the Department of Health, there are among 400 health workers from different countries right now aiding the Philippines. Japan is pledging $10 million in aid for disaster relief.

Do you like this post?
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