Dozens of Indonesian airlines remain on EU blacklist

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Batik AirA large number of Indonesian airlines, among them Lion Air and Indonesia AirAsia X, remained on the updated EU Air Safety List, a list of airlines subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union, released on December 10.

Altogether, 62 lines remain considered unsafe to fly with by the European Aviation Safety Agency, in fact all Indonesian airlines apart from national carrier Garuda Indonesia, as well as Airfast Indonesia, Ekspres Transportasi Antarbenua (Premiair) and Indonesia Air Asia.

Among the best-known carriers deemed unsafe are the country’s largest low-budget airline Lion Air, Batik Air, Citilink and Indonesia AirAsia X, the long-haul unit of Indonesia Air Asia. The latter has its base in Denpasar, Bali, and flies to Australia, Malaysia and Saudi Arabia.

However, it is still better than in 2007 when every Indonesian airline was banned, including Garuda and Indonesia AirAsia. In 2010, they were both removed from that blacklist, and internal EU documents confirmed that they now meet “applicable safety standards” together with the other two exempt. But 92 per cent of Indonesian airlines still don’t.

Indonesia is the only major economy on the EU blacklist among war-torn states like Afghanistan, Angola, Libya, Sudan and many Sub-Saharan African and Central Asian nations.

Airlines in Thailand, some of which feared to be included in the EU blacklist after the country’s  aviation safety was downgraded by the US Federal Aviation Administration earlier in December, were spared by the EU inspectors and given more time to bring their safety procedures in order. But EU regulators issued a “special warning” over traveling on airlines from Thailand.

Destiny Air
Destiny Air of Sierra Leone, now defunct

Among the worst airlines on the list are some that are surrounded by a total lack of information and “might be operating on the border of, or altogether outside, the recognised international aviation regime,” the EU stated.

Among them are carriers with names such as Air Fast Congo and Busy Bee Congo, Tango Airways from Equatorial Guinea, Buddha Air and Yeti Airlines from Nepal, and, most inspiring, Air Rum and Destiny Air Services from Sierra Leone (both apparently defunct). Daallo Airlines, the largest airline serving Somalia, is also no to be trusted.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

A large number of Indonesian airlines, among them Lion Air and Indonesia AirAsia X, remained on the updated EU Air Safety List, a list of airlines subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union, released on December 10.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Batik AirA large number of Indonesian airlines, among them Lion Air and Indonesia AirAsia X, remained on the updated EU Air Safety List, a list of airlines subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union, released on December 10.

Altogether, 62 lines remain considered unsafe to fly with by the European Aviation Safety Agency, in fact all Indonesian airlines apart from national carrier Garuda Indonesia, as well as Airfast Indonesia, Ekspres Transportasi Antarbenua (Premiair) and Indonesia Air Asia.

Among the best-known carriers deemed unsafe are the country’s largest low-budget airline Lion Air, Batik Air, Citilink and Indonesia AirAsia X, the long-haul unit of Indonesia Air Asia. The latter has its base in Denpasar, Bali, and flies to Australia, Malaysia and Saudi Arabia.

However, it is still better than in 2007 when every Indonesian airline was banned, including Garuda and Indonesia AirAsia. In 2010, they were both removed from that blacklist, and internal EU documents confirmed that they now meet “applicable safety standards” together with the other two exempt. But 92 per cent of Indonesian airlines still don’t.

Indonesia is the only major economy on the EU blacklist among war-torn states like Afghanistan, Angola, Libya, Sudan and many Sub-Saharan African and Central Asian nations.

Airlines in Thailand, some of which feared to be included in the EU blacklist after the country’s  aviation safety was downgraded by the US Federal Aviation Administration earlier in December, were spared by the EU inspectors and given more time to bring their safety procedures in order. But EU regulators issued a “special warning” over traveling on airlines from Thailand.

Destiny Air
Destiny Air of Sierra Leone, now defunct

Among the worst airlines on the list are some that are surrounded by a total lack of information and “might be operating on the border of, or altogether outside, the recognised international aviation regime,” the EU stated.

Among them are carriers with names such as Air Fast Congo and Busy Bee Congo, Tango Airways from Equatorial Guinea, Buddha Air and Yeti Airlines from Nepal, and, most inspiring, Air Rum and Destiny Air Services from Sierra Leone (both apparently defunct). Daallo Airlines, the largest airline serving Somalia, is also no to be trusted.

Do you like this post?
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