Drone flight over Laos’ most mysterious corner (video)

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Plain of JarsNew drone footage provides a rare aerial view of the mysterious Plain of Jars in northern Laos. The plain of Jars is home to more than 2,000 stone jars that are believed to be around 2,000 years old. But the area is also littered with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped on the country during the Vietnam War and thus remains widely unexplored and one of the world’s most mysterious archaeological sites.

The Plain of Jars is located in Xieng Khouang province and consists of valleys and foothills covered with thousands of antique stone jars whose exact function is still being debated. Most scholars think the jars are mortuary urns left behind by an unknown civilization. The archaeological site is relevant and unique in Southeast Asia. From what little that has been investigated, it seems that the jars were places of transition in the funerary rites where bodies were left to decompose before going through a final burial.

The Lao government and the UNESCO are now working towards clearing the region of bombs and protecting and restoring the jars. To that end, new aerial footage of the plains has been shot by drone, highlighting the clusters of archaeological sites as well as the bomb craters caused by the US bombardment.

The plain can be reached from Vientiane or Luang Prabang per bus, minivan or hired car via Phonsavan, the provincial capital of Xieng Khouang province which also has an airport to which Lao airlines has six flights a week in peak season and four flights in low season. In Phonsavan, a number of travel agencies offers safe tours to the nearby Plain of Jars. If going, there, we strongly recommend to always stick to the marked walkways to avoid stepping onto an unexploded device.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

New drone footage provides a rare aerial view of the mysterious Plain of Jars in northern Laos. The plain of Jars is home to more than 2,000 stone jars that are believed to be around 2,000 years old. But the area is also littered with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped on the country during the Vietnam War and thus remains widely unexplored and one of the world’s most mysterious archaeological sites.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Plain of JarsNew drone footage provides a rare aerial view of the mysterious Plain of Jars in northern Laos. The plain of Jars is home to more than 2,000 stone jars that are believed to be around 2,000 years old. But the area is also littered with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped on the country during the Vietnam War and thus remains widely unexplored and one of the world’s most mysterious archaeological sites.

The Plain of Jars is located in Xieng Khouang province and consists of valleys and foothills covered with thousands of antique stone jars whose exact function is still being debated. Most scholars think the jars are mortuary urns left behind by an unknown civilization. The archaeological site is relevant and unique in Southeast Asia. From what little that has been investigated, it seems that the jars were places of transition in the funerary rites where bodies were left to decompose before going through a final burial.

The Lao government and the UNESCO are now working towards clearing the region of bombs and protecting and restoring the jars. To that end, new aerial footage of the plains has been shot by drone, highlighting the clusters of archaeological sites as well as the bomb craters caused by the US bombardment.

The plain can be reached from Vientiane or Luang Prabang per bus, minivan or hired car via Phonsavan, the provincial capital of Xieng Khouang province which also has an airport to which Lao airlines has six flights a week in peak season and four flights in low season. In Phonsavan, a number of travel agencies offers safe tours to the nearby Plain of Jars. If going, there, we strongly recommend to always stick to the marked walkways to avoid stepping onto an unexploded device.

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