Dry weather causes mango glut in the Philippines

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Dry Weather Causes Mango Overflow In The Philippines

The Philippines is overflowing with about two million kilos of unwanted mangoes after a hot weather patch caused by weather phenomenon El Nino yielded a monstrous crop. According to agriculture secretary Emmanuel Pinol, the oversupply translates into ten million pieces of mangoes.

The government on June 3 has launched a marketing campaign in a bid to sell one million kilos of the fruit in June before they begin to rot. The surplus of the fruit has already led the price to drop from 58 pesos ($1.11) to as low as 25 pesos ($0.48) per kilogramme.

Part of the campaign it to try to shift a million kilos of mangos to Metro Manila, with stalls selling them for a low price to be put up all around the capital throughout June.

But some farmers in Luzon, where the oversupply is concentrated, have taken to giving away their mangos free, hanging bountiful bags of the fruit outside the gates of their farms.

Pinol stressed the urgency of dealing with the glut before the fruit went to waste and sent the price of mangos crashing further, hurting farmers.

“We need to do something about this in the next two weeks,” he said.

Pinol further said the El Nino climate cycle is to blame for giving the nation a drier and warmer wet season than usual which caused the mango windfall by precipitating profuse flowering and fruiting.

El Nino is a shift in wind patterns which occurs every two to seven years and heats the Pacific Ocean. This sends warmer currents to the Philippines, making the climate generally drier and warmer. While El Nino is a routine climate occurrence from natural causes, some scientists believe that climate change and global warming could intensify its effects and lead to more frequent and intense “super El Nino” events of which the last occurred in 2015 and 2016 that brought severe drought and damage to crops to the Philippines.

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The Philippines is overflowing with about two million kilos of unwanted mangoes after a hot weather patch caused by weather phenomenon El Nino yielded a monstrous crop. According to agriculture secretary Emmanuel Pinol, the oversupply translates into ten million pieces of mangoes. The government on June 3 has launched a marketing campaign in a bid to sell one million kilos of the fruit in June before they begin to rot. The surplus of the fruit has already led the price to drop from 58 pesos ($1.11) to as low as 25 pesos ($0.48) per kilogramme. Part of the campaign it...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Dry Weather Causes Mango Overflow In The Philippines

The Philippines is overflowing with about two million kilos of unwanted mangoes after a hot weather patch caused by weather phenomenon El Nino yielded a monstrous crop. According to agriculture secretary Emmanuel Pinol, the oversupply translates into ten million pieces of mangoes.

The government on June 3 has launched a marketing campaign in a bid to sell one million kilos of the fruit in June before they begin to rot. The surplus of the fruit has already led the price to drop from 58 pesos ($1.11) to as low as 25 pesos ($0.48) per kilogramme.

Part of the campaign it to try to shift a million kilos of mangos to Metro Manila, with stalls selling them for a low price to be put up all around the capital throughout June.

But some farmers in Luzon, where the oversupply is concentrated, have taken to giving away their mangos free, hanging bountiful bags of the fruit outside the gates of their farms.

Pinol stressed the urgency of dealing with the glut before the fruit went to waste and sent the price of mangos crashing further, hurting farmers.

“We need to do something about this in the next two weeks,” he said.

Pinol further said the El Nino climate cycle is to blame for giving the nation a drier and warmer wet season than usual which caused the mango windfall by precipitating profuse flowering and fruiting.

El Nino is a shift in wind patterns which occurs every two to seven years and heats the Pacific Ocean. This sends warmer currents to the Philippines, making the climate generally drier and warmer. While El Nino is a routine climate occurrence from natural causes, some scientists believe that climate change and global warming could intensify its effects and lead to more frequent and intense “super El Nino” events of which the last occurred in 2015 and 2016 that brought severe drought and damage to crops to the Philippines.

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