E-trikes roll out in the Philippines

Reading Time: 1 minute

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Philippine government have established a $399-million project to replace the soot-belching tricycles that shuttle residents in Manila and other urban centres with 100,000 electric-run models.

The Philippine government is contributing some $99 million to the five-year project, while the ADB has pledged $300 million. The long-term objective of the project is to eventually replace 3.5 million gas-powered tricycles with e-trikes.

Metro Manila, the sprawling satellites cities that surround it and other urban centers across the Philippines are poorly serviced by bus networks, leaving residents to rely on pollution-emitting tricycles to navigate the narrow roads of their cities.

E-trikes will be a much-welcomed relief from petrol-reliant counterparts. The cleaner models are run on electric motors and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, and will be introduced under lease-to-own arrangements.

The Philippines, an energy importing nation, will become less dependent on neighbours once the e-trikes begin rolling out, carrying with them plenty of economic relief.

The cost of charging a battery will be $1.20 a day, compared to the average $6 to $8 in fuel tricycles burn every day, according to the ADB.

Beyond the introduction of e-trikes, the project will also oversee the establishment of an electric vehicle parts industry, supply chains for electric batteries and charging stations.

The Philippine government estimates that the manufacturing requirements to assemble the e-trikes will create up to 10,000 jobs.

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 1 minute

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Philippine government have established a $399-million project to replace the soot-belching tricycles that shuttle residents in Manila and other urban centres with 100,000 electric-run models.

Reading Time: 1 minute

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Philippine government have established a $399-million project to replace the soot-belching tricycles that shuttle residents in Manila and other urban centres with 100,000 electric-run models.

The Philippine government is contributing some $99 million to the five-year project, while the ADB has pledged $300 million. The long-term objective of the project is to eventually replace 3.5 million gas-powered tricycles with e-trikes.

Metro Manila, the sprawling satellites cities that surround it and other urban centers across the Philippines are poorly serviced by bus networks, leaving residents to rely on pollution-emitting tricycles to navigate the narrow roads of their cities.

E-trikes will be a much-welcomed relief from petrol-reliant counterparts. The cleaner models are run on electric motors and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, and will be introduced under lease-to-own arrangements.

The Philippines, an energy importing nation, will become less dependent on neighbours once the e-trikes begin rolling out, carrying with them plenty of economic relief.

The cost of charging a battery will be $1.20 a day, compared to the average $6 to $8 in fuel tricycles burn every day, according to the ADB.

Beyond the introduction of e-trikes, the project will also oversee the establishment of an electric vehicle parts industry, supply chains for electric batteries and charging stations.

The Philippine government estimates that the manufacturing requirements to assemble the e-trikes will create up to 10,000 jobs.

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid