Education in focus at TechCrunch Disrupt 2013 event (photos)

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Ed Lee
Ed Lee, Mayor of San Francisco

TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2013, a notable technology conference that regularly draws prominent speakers from the technology and start-up scene in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, on September 9 put one focus on the importance of combining Internet technology and higher education.

By Kamran Saddique

“Online education and higher education institutions can work together, and they are not a threat to each other. There are so many individuals or potential students who are left aside as they cannot pay for their tuition fees so this is an opportunity for all,” said Sebastian Thrun, co-founder of Udacity and founder of Google X .

“And there are so many companies that are looking for talent because there is a huge shortage of experts such as data scientists and other technical talent that can benefit from online education,” he added.

In today’s tech world, 65 per cent of kids who come out of grade school will take up jobs that never existed before, said Gavin Newsom, Lieutenant Governor of California.

“Higher education needs to be fixed and the industry needs to get disrupted by higher education institutions playing an instrumental part,” Newsom said.

“Private companies and higher education institutions are not talking at all,” he claimed.

“There are 100,000s of jobs that could be filled but the skill set of the labour force is not there for these jobs. Twitter, Facebook, Google, Salesforce and the like should talk to higher education institutions and vice versa.”

Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn, said that it will take time to reach this goal.

“Education needs investment and it will take a generation to approach the issue and fix it,” he said.

In a first step, middle schools in San Francisco for the first time have WiFi in class, remarked  Edwin Lee, Mayor of San Francisco.

He also gave some numbers that quantify the impact of the industry’s growth on the city. So far in 2013, 1,892 tech companies have been set up within the San Francisco area, up 3.6 per cent from a year ago, and the city has added about 45,493 tech jobs. Some 48 per cent of office space is used by tech companies, and there are just 498 manufacturing companies among them.

However, the effect on real estate prices was also significant. San Francisco rents rose the most of any US urban areas in the second quarter of 2013 by an average of 7.8 per cent. Construction jobs are up by 8.4 per cent, and there are 35 development projects and 4,500 new housing units underway.

TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington pressed Lee on what he was doing to manage the change for middle- and lower-income San Francisco residents.

Lee said that the city “has done what it can” to plan around the industry’s growth by setting aside a $1.2 billion housing trust fund to support more affordable housing units.

“Our job is to accommodate 100 per cent of everybody who wants to be here,” he said. “We are trying to protect as many of the rent-controlled housing as we can.”

Lee mentioned that the unemployment rate was down to 5.9 per cent and job growth up 61 per cent since he took office in 2011.

See photos from the TechCrunch event:

TechCrunch6

TechCrunch5

TechCrunch4

TechCrunch3

TechCrunch2

TechCrunch1

TechCrunch

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Reading Time: 3 minutes

Ed Lee, Mayor of San Francisco

TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2013, a notable technology conference that regularly draws prominent speakers from the technology and start-up scene in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, on September 9 put one focus on the importance of combining Internet technology and higher education.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Ed Lee
Ed Lee, Mayor of San Francisco

TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2013, a notable technology conference that regularly draws prominent speakers from the technology and start-up scene in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, on September 9 put one focus on the importance of combining Internet technology and higher education.

By Kamran Saddique

“Online education and higher education institutions can work together, and they are not a threat to each other. There are so many individuals or potential students who are left aside as they cannot pay for their tuition fees so this is an opportunity for all,” said Sebastian Thrun, co-founder of Udacity and founder of Google X .

“And there are so many companies that are looking for talent because there is a huge shortage of experts such as data scientists and other technical talent that can benefit from online education,” he added.

In today’s tech world, 65 per cent of kids who come out of grade school will take up jobs that never existed before, said Gavin Newsom, Lieutenant Governor of California.

“Higher education needs to be fixed and the industry needs to get disrupted by higher education institutions playing an instrumental part,” Newsom said.

“Private companies and higher education institutions are not talking at all,” he claimed.

“There are 100,000s of jobs that could be filled but the skill set of the labour force is not there for these jobs. Twitter, Facebook, Google, Salesforce and the like should talk to higher education institutions and vice versa.”

Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn, said that it will take time to reach this goal.

“Education needs investment and it will take a generation to approach the issue and fix it,” he said.

In a first step, middle schools in San Francisco for the first time have WiFi in class, remarked  Edwin Lee, Mayor of San Francisco.

He also gave some numbers that quantify the impact of the industry’s growth on the city. So far in 2013, 1,892 tech companies have been set up within the San Francisco area, up 3.6 per cent from a year ago, and the city has added about 45,493 tech jobs. Some 48 per cent of office space is used by tech companies, and there are just 498 manufacturing companies among them.

However, the effect on real estate prices was also significant. San Francisco rents rose the most of any US urban areas in the second quarter of 2013 by an average of 7.8 per cent. Construction jobs are up by 8.4 per cent, and there are 35 development projects and 4,500 new housing units underway.

TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington pressed Lee on what he was doing to manage the change for middle- and lower-income San Francisco residents.

Lee said that the city “has done what it can” to plan around the industry’s growth by setting aside a $1.2 billion housing trust fund to support more affordable housing units.

“Our job is to accommodate 100 per cent of everybody who wants to be here,” he said. “We are trying to protect as many of the rent-controlled housing as we can.”

Lee mentioned that the unemployment rate was down to 5.9 per cent and job growth up 61 per cent since he took office in 2011.

See photos from the TechCrunch event:

TechCrunch6

TechCrunch5

TechCrunch4

TechCrunch3

TechCrunch2

TechCrunch1

TechCrunch

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