Joseph Estrada declared Manila mayor

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Joseph Estrada, Francisco DomagosoFormer Philippine President Joseph Estrada has been declared mayor of Manila on May 14 in what was his first elected post since he was ousted in a 2001 revolt on corruption charges.

The partial and unofficial tally showed Estrada of the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) with 288,058 votes while incumbent Mayor Alfredo Lim of the Liberal Party (LP) had 257,631 as of time of writing.

Estrada was capitalising on his movie-star popularity, particularly among the poor masses, and urban decay in Manila, the historical heart of the Philippine capital along Manila Bay. Once a lively tourist spot, the streets of Manila have become neglected, many popular establishments moved out and residents complain of crime.

Estrada, 78, said he felt vindicated. “‘It’s my consolation that people still have trust in me despite all the black propaganda thrown at me,” he said.

In other partial results following May 13 congressional and local polls, nine senatorial candidates backed by President Benigno Aquino III took an early lead against three candidates backed by an opposition coalition. About half the votes have been reported by May 14 in the morning, and if the trend continues, the win will ensure support for Aquino’s remaining three years in office.

Elections Commission Chairman Sixto Brillantes said he expects a turnout of 70 per cent. More than 52 million voters registered to elect 18,000 officials, including half of the 24-member Senate, nearly 300 members of the House of Representatives and leaders of a Muslim autonomous region in the south, where Islamic insurgents and militants are a concern.

The Aquino administration is confident they will maintain the majority in the House and the focus of the electoral battle was on the Senate, traditionally a springboard for the presidency.

As in previous elections, the ballots were stacked with familiar names of at least 250 political families who have monopolized power across the country, from former first lady Imelda Marcos, 83, to newly minted politicians like boxing star Manny Pacquiao. Both are expected to keep their House seats.

 

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Former Philippine President Joseph Estrada has been declared mayor of Manila on May 14 in what was his first elected post since he was ousted in a 2001 revolt on corruption charges.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Joseph Estrada, Francisco DomagosoFormer Philippine President Joseph Estrada has been declared mayor of Manila on May 14 in what was his first elected post since he was ousted in a 2001 revolt on corruption charges.

The partial and unofficial tally showed Estrada of the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) with 288,058 votes while incumbent Mayor Alfredo Lim of the Liberal Party (LP) had 257,631 as of time of writing.

Estrada was capitalising on his movie-star popularity, particularly among the poor masses, and urban decay in Manila, the historical heart of the Philippine capital along Manila Bay. Once a lively tourist spot, the streets of Manila have become neglected, many popular establishments moved out and residents complain of crime.

Estrada, 78, said he felt vindicated. “‘It’s my consolation that people still have trust in me despite all the black propaganda thrown at me,” he said.

In other partial results following May 13 congressional and local polls, nine senatorial candidates backed by President Benigno Aquino III took an early lead against three candidates backed by an opposition coalition. About half the votes have been reported by May 14 in the morning, and if the trend continues, the win will ensure support for Aquino’s remaining three years in office.

Elections Commission Chairman Sixto Brillantes said he expects a turnout of 70 per cent. More than 52 million voters registered to elect 18,000 officials, including half of the 24-member Senate, nearly 300 members of the House of Representatives and leaders of a Muslim autonomous region in the south, where Islamic insurgents and militants are a concern.

The Aquino administration is confident they will maintain the majority in the House and the focus of the electoral battle was on the Senate, traditionally a springboard for the presidency.

As in previous elections, the ballots were stacked with familiar names of at least 250 political families who have monopolized power across the country, from former first lady Imelda Marcos, 83, to newly minted politicians like boxing star Manny Pacquiao. Both are expected to keep their House seats.

 

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid