Expats in Myanmar worried by draconian residency regulations

Reading Time: 2 minutes

New draft laws that introduce tight regulations for foreigners working in Myanmar are rattling the country’s fast growing expat community and have already triggered protests from foreign business associations and investor groups.

The draft “Law Concerning Foreigners” and the “Foreign Worker Law” lists requirements that are indeed a bit over the top, for example the provision that a foreigner working in Myanmar has to obtain approval from the authorities in case he or she is absent from a registered residence for more than 24 hours.

The proposed laws also require foreigners living and working in Myanmar to obtain a slew of documentation and to undergo medical examination within seven days of arriving in the country, and they also impose restrictions on traveling and relocating.

Foreigners who are planning to reside in Myanmar for more than 90 days are required to obtain a Foreigner Registration Certificate (FRC) and carry it at all times. Under the draft laws, failing to apply for the certificate could see the offender behind bars for up to five years.

Both laws have been slammed by lawyers and analysts for at best creating more bureaucratic red tape, and at worst, fanning the flames of nationalist, anti-foreigner sentiment and in doing so, creating a climate hostile to potential investors. They say it also increases the risk of corruption as so many permissions and documents are required.

In a joint statement, nine foreign business chambers expressed concern over some of the provisions of the draft laws.

A European Chamber of Commerce in Myanmar representative said that members of the chamber were concerned over the right the new law would give authorities to enter into residential premises of foreigners and arrest them without a warrant, including when a foreigner is suspected of violating regulations.

The official also said imprisonment for failing to renew the FRC or notifying the loss of FRC, not bearing the FRC, as well as not mentioning relocation addresses was “excessive.”

 

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

New draft laws that introduce tight regulations for foreigners working in Myanmar are rattling the country’s fast growing expat community and have already triggered protests from foreign business associations and investor groups.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

New draft laws that introduce tight regulations for foreigners working in Myanmar are rattling the country’s fast growing expat community and have already triggered protests from foreign business associations and investor groups.

The draft “Law Concerning Foreigners” and the “Foreign Worker Law” lists requirements that are indeed a bit over the top, for example the provision that a foreigner working in Myanmar has to obtain approval from the authorities in case he or she is absent from a registered residence for more than 24 hours.

The proposed laws also require foreigners living and working in Myanmar to obtain a slew of documentation and to undergo medical examination within seven days of arriving in the country, and they also impose restrictions on traveling and relocating.

Foreigners who are planning to reside in Myanmar for more than 90 days are required to obtain a Foreigner Registration Certificate (FRC) and carry it at all times. Under the draft laws, failing to apply for the certificate could see the offender behind bars for up to five years.

Both laws have been slammed by lawyers and analysts for at best creating more bureaucratic red tape, and at worst, fanning the flames of nationalist, anti-foreigner sentiment and in doing so, creating a climate hostile to potential investors. They say it also increases the risk of corruption as so many permissions and documents are required.

In a joint statement, nine foreign business chambers expressed concern over some of the provisions of the draft laws.

A European Chamber of Commerce in Myanmar representative said that members of the chamber were concerned over the right the new law would give authorities to enter into residential premises of foreigners and arrest them without a warrant, including when a foreigner is suspected of violating regulations.

The official also said imprisonment for failing to renew the FRC or notifying the loss of FRC, not bearing the FRC, as well as not mentioning relocation addresses was “excessive.”

 

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid