Filipinos encouraged to invest more

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Suze Orman
Suze Orman financial adviser and television host

US personal finance expert Suze Orman, best known for her Emmy-award winning TV show and best selling books, has pressed Filipinos to invest in stocks, charging that investment upgrades mean nothing if citizens don’t take part in their country’s new credibility.

The unashamedly blunt talk show host pointed to the country’s bourse as holding the most accessible investment opportunities for the average Filipinos, in light of the fact that exchange trade funds are not yet available in the country.

“I still believe that the place to be is in stocks, or exchange trade funds which you don’t have yet here that pay high dividends because interest rates are so low,” Orman said at a press briefing in Manila last week.

“If people are investing especially when you are not educated in investing, I think it is far better off to go Philippine Stock Exchange funds that are index funds and just put a certain amount of pesos in it every single month no matter what it does up or down. I think in the long-run you would probably outperform managed funds,” she added.

According to Orman, just because the Philippines has become an attractive market for investors doesn’t mean that Filipinos will passively benefit.

“I don’t believe the ratings upgrade will help Filipinos who are poor unless they understand what to do with their money,” Orman said at a talk sponsored by the Bank of the Philippines Islands in Cebu during her visit.

“Your country is doing great right now. But are you doing as great as your own country? Do you have savings? Do you have investments? Do you own your home outright? Do you have enough for retirement?” she prodded.

Orman also recommended that Philippine investors stop looking abroad to invest in currencies and stay long on the peso.

“Stop with the dollar. Do you really think Americans know what they’re doing?” Orman chided.

Orman took a moment to encourage the government to better assist the public in making sound financial decisions.

“What would be wonderful is to get government’s blessing on [financial literacy] programs that could be made available to everybody. That nobody would benefit. It would be sponsored by just one bank, it would be something really for the entire country to do. So we’ll see where it goes, see if they’re apt for that,” Orman said.

Known for making her characteristically cutting financial assessments on the affordability of purchases submitted by her viewers, Orman is credited with coining the term “latte expenses,” which she uses to chastise spending on frivolous items that add up quickly.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Suze Orman financial adviser and television host

US personal finance expert Suze Orman, best known for her Emmy-award winning TV show and best selling books, has pressed Filipinos to invest in stocks, charging that investment upgrades mean nothing if citizens don’t take part in their country’s new credibility.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Suze Orman
Suze Orman financial adviser and television host

US personal finance expert Suze Orman, best known for her Emmy-award winning TV show and best selling books, has pressed Filipinos to invest in stocks, charging that investment upgrades mean nothing if citizens don’t take part in their country’s new credibility.

The unashamedly blunt talk show host pointed to the country’s bourse as holding the most accessible investment opportunities for the average Filipinos, in light of the fact that exchange trade funds are not yet available in the country.

“I still believe that the place to be is in stocks, or exchange trade funds which you don’t have yet here that pay high dividends because interest rates are so low,” Orman said at a press briefing in Manila last week.

“If people are investing especially when you are not educated in investing, I think it is far better off to go Philippine Stock Exchange funds that are index funds and just put a certain amount of pesos in it every single month no matter what it does up or down. I think in the long-run you would probably outperform managed funds,” she added.

According to Orman, just because the Philippines has become an attractive market for investors doesn’t mean that Filipinos will passively benefit.

“I don’t believe the ratings upgrade will help Filipinos who are poor unless they understand what to do with their money,” Orman said at a talk sponsored by the Bank of the Philippines Islands in Cebu during her visit.

“Your country is doing great right now. But are you doing as great as your own country? Do you have savings? Do you have investments? Do you own your home outright? Do you have enough for retirement?” she prodded.

Orman also recommended that Philippine investors stop looking abroad to invest in currencies and stay long on the peso.

“Stop with the dollar. Do you really think Americans know what they’re doing?” Orman chided.

Orman took a moment to encourage the government to better assist the public in making sound financial decisions.

“What would be wonderful is to get government’s blessing on [financial literacy] programs that could be made available to everybody. That nobody would benefit. It would be sponsored by just one bank, it would be something really for the entire country to do. So we’ll see where it goes, see if they’re apt for that,” Orman said.

Known for making her characteristically cutting financial assessments on the affordability of purchases submitted by her viewers, Orman is credited with coining the term “latte expenses,” which she uses to chastise spending on frivolous items that add up quickly.

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