Flight MH370 case closed, fate will possibly never be known

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The final report on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which went missing without a trace while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014, says that the fate of the aircraft may never be known and will likely remain a mystery.

The report, released on October 3 by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said investigators were unable to locate the wreckage of the plane despite years of searching and more than $150 million in costs for combing remote waters in the Indian Ocean off the western coast of Australia.

Perhaps most significantly, the report provided more detail about pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah’s flight simulator that contained a route similar to the one investigators think the missing plane took. In a session from six weeks before MH370’s disappearance, the simulator was used to recreate the flight of a Boeing 777-200LR, a similar model to the aircraft that was lost.

The simulated path took the aircraft from Kuala Lumpur, north of Indonesia, and then south into the southern Indian Ocean. The simulated plane was flown until it ran out of fuel. Shah was off work on the day the simulation was flown, according to records.

This would support one theory about the plane’s disappearance which assumes that the pilot might have deliberately steered it to its doom in a suicide mission. But still, there is no evidence for it whatsoever.

“The reasons for the loss of MH370 cannot be established with certainty until the aircraft is found,” the report said.

The report’s writers apologised to the families of the passengers and crew for their inability to find the plane. “We share your profound and prolonged grief and deeply regret that we have not been able to locate the aircraft, nor those 239 souls on board that remain missing… The failure to locate the aircraft is almost inconceivable and certainly societally unacceptable.”

Interestingly, one of the chief investigators into the MH370 disappearance, Honorary Consul of Malaysia to Madagascar, Zahid Raza, was reportedly gunned down in the center of the island nation’s capital Antananarivo on August 24, just about two week’s ahead of the final report’s issuance. Reportedly, he had been due to deliver new, unspecified plane debris found in Madagascar and Mozambique to Malaysian investigators in Kuala Lumpur. The reason for the shooting remains unclear, and some observers described it as an “assassination.”

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The final report on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which went missing without a trace while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014, says that the fate of the aircraft may never be known and will likely remain a mystery. The report, released on October 3 by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said investigators were unable to locate the wreckage of the plane despite years of searching and more than $150 million in costs for combing remote waters in the Indian Ocean off the western coast of Australia. Perhaps most significantly, the report provided more detail about pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah's...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The final report on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which went missing without a trace while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014, says that the fate of the aircraft may never be known and will likely remain a mystery.

The report, released on October 3 by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said investigators were unable to locate the wreckage of the plane despite years of searching and more than $150 million in costs for combing remote waters in the Indian Ocean off the western coast of Australia.

Perhaps most significantly, the report provided more detail about pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah’s flight simulator that contained a route similar to the one investigators think the missing plane took. In a session from six weeks before MH370’s disappearance, the simulator was used to recreate the flight of a Boeing 777-200LR, a similar model to the aircraft that was lost.

The simulated path took the aircraft from Kuala Lumpur, north of Indonesia, and then south into the southern Indian Ocean. The simulated plane was flown until it ran out of fuel. Shah was off work on the day the simulation was flown, according to records.

This would support one theory about the plane’s disappearance which assumes that the pilot might have deliberately steered it to its doom in a suicide mission. But still, there is no evidence for it whatsoever.

“The reasons for the loss of MH370 cannot be established with certainty until the aircraft is found,” the report said.

The report’s writers apologised to the families of the passengers and crew for their inability to find the plane. “We share your profound and prolonged grief and deeply regret that we have not been able to locate the aircraft, nor those 239 souls on board that remain missing… The failure to locate the aircraft is almost inconceivable and certainly societally unacceptable.”

Interestingly, one of the chief investigators into the MH370 disappearance, Honorary Consul of Malaysia to Madagascar, Zahid Raza, was reportedly gunned down in the center of the island nation’s capital Antananarivo on August 24, just about two week’s ahead of the final report’s issuance. Reportedly, he had been due to deliver new, unspecified plane debris found in Madagascar and Mozambique to Malaysian investigators in Kuala Lumpur. The reason for the shooting remains unclear, and some observers described it as an “assassination.”

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