Food security in focus at ASEM Summit

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Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikha Hasina asks for more action against climate change

The two-day 9th Asia-Europe (ASEM) Summit held at the National Convention Centre in Vientiane, Laos on November 5 and 6 saw heads of state from Europe and Asia participate in discussions on food and energy security, climate change, sustainable development, natural disaster risk management, and economic and cultural cooperation, amongst other issues.

Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikha Hasina urged attendees on the concluding day of the summit to live up to commitments to alleviate climate change and proposed the establishment of a “wide-ranging agricultural research initiative under ASEM to increase food production, considering future food security,” reported The Daily Star.

“Both climate change and food security issues are important for our survival, sustenance and prosperity as well as for the world,” Hasina said.

Investment in innovative technology development was critical, she said, making her statement clear that partners at the summit distinguish “development finance” from simple “climate change support.”

The ASEM Summit was also attended by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Abdul Tun Razak, who discussed food security issues with ASEM leaders, Bernama reported.

Calling for increased international and regional efforts in food security at the Global Science and Innovation Advisory Council (GSIAC) meeting in Kuala Lumpur on November 1, Najib similarly noted that innovations in food production technology, improved irrigation and better management of manpower are key solutions to the issue.

Technology transfer between developed and emerging nations to combat climate change, especially in Southeast Asia were floods vastly impact agriculture, which is still the largest economic sector in many countries, was urged by leaders of the summit as well.

In South Asia, the effects of climate change have been equally debilitating.

“In Bangladesh, our loss due to climate change is about 2 per cent of our annual GDP and all damage considered our total loss could be 3 to 4 percent of our GDP,” Bangladesh’s prime minister Hasina told her audience.

She has called for a legally binding document that would hold countries to their responsibilities to protect the climate.

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikha Hasina asks for more action against climate change

The two-day 9th Asia-Europe (ASEM) Summit held at the National Convention Centre in Vientiane, Laos on November 5 and 6 saw heads of state from Europe and Asia participate in discussions on food and energy security, climate change, sustainable development, natural disaster risk management, and economic and cultural cooperation, amongst other issues.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikha Hasina asks for more action against climate change

The two-day 9th Asia-Europe (ASEM) Summit held at the National Convention Centre in Vientiane, Laos on November 5 and 6 saw heads of state from Europe and Asia participate in discussions on food and energy security, climate change, sustainable development, natural disaster risk management, and economic and cultural cooperation, amongst other issues.

Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikha Hasina urged attendees on the concluding day of the summit to live up to commitments to alleviate climate change and proposed the establishment of a “wide-ranging agricultural research initiative under ASEM to increase food production, considering future food security,” reported The Daily Star.

“Both climate change and food security issues are important for our survival, sustenance and prosperity as well as for the world,” Hasina said.

Investment in innovative technology development was critical, she said, making her statement clear that partners at the summit distinguish “development finance” from simple “climate change support.”

The ASEM Summit was also attended by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Abdul Tun Razak, who discussed food security issues with ASEM leaders, Bernama reported.

Calling for increased international and regional efforts in food security at the Global Science and Innovation Advisory Council (GSIAC) meeting in Kuala Lumpur on November 1, Najib similarly noted that innovations in food production technology, improved irrigation and better management of manpower are key solutions to the issue.

Technology transfer between developed and emerging nations to combat climate change, especially in Southeast Asia were floods vastly impact agriculture, which is still the largest economic sector in many countries, was urged by leaders of the summit as well.

In South Asia, the effects of climate change have been equally debilitating.

“In Bangladesh, our loss due to climate change is about 2 per cent of our annual GDP and all damage considered our total loss could be 3 to 4 percent of our GDP,” Bangladesh’s prime minister Hasina told her audience.

She has called for a legally binding document that would hold countries to their responsibilities to protect the climate.

 

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