Global ad group first to enter Myanmar

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Advertising in Myanmar is mainly focused on outdoor billboards

The world’s largest advertising group WPP, owner of advertising, public relations and market research companies such as Ogilvy & Mather, Burson-Marsteller, Hill & Knowlton, Grey, JWT, TNS and Young & Rubicam, is the first foreign advertising group to invest in Myanmar since sanctions were lifted earlier this year.

The group said that it is betting on a flood of demand from multinational companies wanting to market their goods and services in the former pariah state.

“It’s not often that a market of this size opens up, with this history and infrastructure and capability, so it’s very, very exciting,” WPP Chief Executive Martin Sorrell told news agency Reuters.

In a first step, WPP’s subsidiary Ogilvy & Mather has acquired a stake in Myanmar leading advertising agency Today Advertising based in Yangon.

“Today Advertising has a great reputation in Myanmar. We believe they are the perfect partner to work alongside us and our clients as the business potential of Asia’s newest frontier becomes apparent,” Paul Heath, CEO, Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific, said in an statement released by the agency.

According to advertising magazine Ad Age, “Ogilvy’s Myanmar entry will probably put the country on other agencies’ shortlists for expansion.”

Myanmar has a population of almost 60 million at an average age of 27 and $800 in average annual per capita income. The recent opening of the country to foreign investors is expected to lead to a surge in consumer purchasing power in the long run.

Myanmar’s advertising market was worth just $33 million in 2011, according to media buyer ZenithOptimedia, compared with $600 million for Vietnam, indicating a huge upside potential. Advertising is currently focused on TV and outdoor billboards and to a smaller extent on newspapers and magazines, with Internet advertising and other forms of electronic advertising or public relations basically inexistent.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Advertising in Myanmar is mainly focused on outdoor billboards

The world’s largest advertising group WPP, owner of advertising, public relations and market research companies such as Ogilvy & Mather, Burson-Marsteller, Hill & Knowlton, Grey, JWT, TNS and Young & Rubicam, is the first foreign advertising group to invest in Myanmar since sanctions were lifted earlier this year.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Advertising in Myanmar is mainly focused on outdoor billboards

The world’s largest advertising group WPP, owner of advertising, public relations and market research companies such as Ogilvy & Mather, Burson-Marsteller, Hill & Knowlton, Grey, JWT, TNS and Young & Rubicam, is the first foreign advertising group to invest in Myanmar since sanctions were lifted earlier this year.

The group said that it is betting on a flood of demand from multinational companies wanting to market their goods and services in the former pariah state.

“It’s not often that a market of this size opens up, with this history and infrastructure and capability, so it’s very, very exciting,” WPP Chief Executive Martin Sorrell told news agency Reuters.

In a first step, WPP’s subsidiary Ogilvy & Mather has acquired a stake in Myanmar leading advertising agency Today Advertising based in Yangon.

“Today Advertising has a great reputation in Myanmar. We believe they are the perfect partner to work alongside us and our clients as the business potential of Asia’s newest frontier becomes apparent,” Paul Heath, CEO, Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific, said in an statement released by the agency.

According to advertising magazine Ad Age, “Ogilvy’s Myanmar entry will probably put the country on other agencies’ shortlists for expansion.”

Myanmar has a population of almost 60 million at an average age of 27 and $800 in average annual per capita income. The recent opening of the country to foreign investors is expected to lead to a surge in consumer purchasing power in the long run.

Myanmar’s advertising market was worth just $33 million in 2011, according to media buyer ZenithOptimedia, compared with $600 million for Vietnam, indicating a huge upside potential. Advertising is currently focused on TV and outdoor billboards and to a smaller extent on newspapers and magazines, with Internet advertising and other forms of electronic advertising or public relations basically inexistent.

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