Grab launches service in Cambodia, challenging Uber

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Singapore-headquartered ride-hailing firm Grab on December 19 launched its services in Cambodia, making it the eighth country in Southeast Asia the company is now present. The entrance is widely seen as a challenge to first-mover and rival Uber which entered the Cambodian market in September this year.

One of the core services Grab will offer in Cambodia is JustGrab, an app which allows passenger to book a ride and see the exact fare, eliminating the need to haggle with the driver – a big step for a country where haggling with drivers of taxis without meters is common for tourist and locals alike.

Grab is also working to make payments more convenient for drivers and passengers as Cambodia moves towards digital services. It is partnering with Wing Money, the country’s leading mobile banking service, to set up accounts for drivers. Passengers can pay for rides in cash or using GrabPay, an app that allows them to pay with a credit card, which, however, aren’t widely used by average people Cambodia.

The Grab service will start in Phnom Penh and later be expanded to other cities. Grab also signed an agreement with the Cambodian Ministry of Public Works and Transport to support infrastructure development.

Reportedly, Grab’s has so far 500 local drivers registered for its services at the start.

Grab now operates in 156 cities in eight Southeast Asian countries: Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar and Cambodia. The company said it has more than 2.1 million drivers and over 72 million downloads for its app.

Grab also stated in a news release that it controls over 72 per cent of the Southeast Asian market for private-vehicle hailing. It aims to have the region’s largest car rental fleet by October 2018, for all of which it is loaded with $2 billion in venture capital from Japan’s Softbank and China’s Didi Chuxing.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Singapore-headquartered ride-hailing firm Grab on December 19 launched its services in Cambodia, making it the eighth country in Southeast Asia the company is now present. The entrance is widely seen as a challenge to first-mover and rival Uber which entered the Cambodian market in September this year.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Singapore-headquartered ride-hailing firm Grab on December 19 launched its services in Cambodia, making it the eighth country in Southeast Asia the company is now present. The entrance is widely seen as a challenge to first-mover and rival Uber which entered the Cambodian market in September this year.

One of the core services Grab will offer in Cambodia is JustGrab, an app which allows passenger to book a ride and see the exact fare, eliminating the need to haggle with the driver – a big step for a country where haggling with drivers of taxis without meters is common for tourist and locals alike.

Grab is also working to make payments more convenient for drivers and passengers as Cambodia moves towards digital services. It is partnering with Wing Money, the country’s leading mobile banking service, to set up accounts for drivers. Passengers can pay for rides in cash or using GrabPay, an app that allows them to pay with a credit card, which, however, aren’t widely used by average people Cambodia.

The Grab service will start in Phnom Penh and later be expanded to other cities. Grab also signed an agreement with the Cambodian Ministry of Public Works and Transport to support infrastructure development.

Reportedly, Grab’s has so far 500 local drivers registered for its services at the start.

Grab now operates in 156 cities in eight Southeast Asian countries: Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar and Cambodia. The company said it has more than 2.1 million drivers and over 72 million downloads for its app.

Grab also stated in a news release that it controls over 72 per cent of the Southeast Asian market for private-vehicle hailing. It aims to have the region’s largest car rental fleet by October 2018, for all of which it is loaded with $2 billion in venture capital from Japan’s Softbank and China’s Didi Chuxing.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid