Guns in Jakarta attack apparently from Philippines – Bombing foiled in KL

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Jakarta attack arsenalIndonesian police believe that the guns used in the terrorist attack in Jakarta on January 14 Indonesia originated from the Philippines, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The paper quoted police spokesman Anton Charliyan as saying that guns collected from the dead attackers and another nine guns seized in counterterrorism raids around the country are suspected of coming from the neighbouring country, describing them as “well-built.”

Judging by the police photos, the pistol could be a from a remake production of the Nambu 14 gun, an semi-automatic pistol model used by the Japanese in World War II and subsequently in various guerrilla conflicts in Southeast Asia in the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaya and others.

Information on the origin of the weapons came from some of the 12 people arrested in the raids in connection with the attack for which terror group ISIS claimed responsibility, Charliyan said.

After the news spread, a radio report in the Philippines said that the Philippine National Police will conduct an investigation into the matter. So far, there are no intelligence reports confirming that the guns were indeed originating in the country.

Indonesian police also said they didn’t know whether there was any connection between the attacks in Jakarta and four arrests made between January 11 and 15 in Malaysia. Police detained four people in Kuala Lumpur and neighbouring Selangor state on suspicions of planning an attack and having connections to Islamic State.

On January 17, a Malaysian man was detained just hours before planning to blow himself up at an entertainment venue, either a karaoke bar or a pub, in Kuala Lumpur, a government official said. The man confessed he planned to blow himself up in an attack after receiving orders from ISIS members in Syria.

Malaysia raised the alert to the highest level following the Jakarta bombings. Police officials named specific places which terrorists could likely target, including the popular tourist and entertainment belt in Bukit Bintang, upmarket malls in Kuala Lumpur’s “golden triangle” area, the city’s main shopping and entertainment area south of the Petronas Towers, and the affluent residential suburb of Bangsar.

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Indonesian police believe that the guns used in the terrorist attack in Jakarta on January 14 Indonesia originated from the Philippines, the Wall Street Journal reports. The paper quoted police spokesman Anton Charliyan as saying that guns collected from the dead attackers and another nine guns seized in counterterrorism raids around the country are suspected of coming from the neighbouring country, describing them as "well-built." Judging by the police photos, the pistol could be a from a remake production of the Nambu 14 gun, an semi-automatic pistol model used by the Japanese in World War II and subsequently in various...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Jakarta attack arsenalIndonesian police believe that the guns used in the terrorist attack in Jakarta on January 14 Indonesia originated from the Philippines, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The paper quoted police spokesman Anton Charliyan as saying that guns collected from the dead attackers and another nine guns seized in counterterrorism raids around the country are suspected of coming from the neighbouring country, describing them as “well-built.”

Judging by the police photos, the pistol could be a from a remake production of the Nambu 14 gun, an semi-automatic pistol model used by the Japanese in World War II and subsequently in various guerrilla conflicts in Southeast Asia in the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaya and others.

Information on the origin of the weapons came from some of the 12 people arrested in the raids in connection with the attack for which terror group ISIS claimed responsibility, Charliyan said.

After the news spread, a radio report in the Philippines said that the Philippine National Police will conduct an investigation into the matter. So far, there are no intelligence reports confirming that the guns were indeed originating in the country.

Indonesian police also said they didn’t know whether there was any connection between the attacks in Jakarta and four arrests made between January 11 and 15 in Malaysia. Police detained four people in Kuala Lumpur and neighbouring Selangor state on suspicions of planning an attack and having connections to Islamic State.

On January 17, a Malaysian man was detained just hours before planning to blow himself up at an entertainment venue, either a karaoke bar or a pub, in Kuala Lumpur, a government official said. The man confessed he planned to blow himself up in an attack after receiving orders from ISIS members in Syria.

Malaysia raised the alert to the highest level following the Jakarta bombings. Police officials named specific places which terrorists could likely target, including the popular tourist and entertainment belt in Bukit Bintang, upmarket malls in Kuala Lumpur’s “golden triangle” area, the city’s main shopping and entertainment area south of the Petronas Towers, and the affluent residential suburb of Bangsar.

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