Halloween time: The top 10 monsters in the Philippines

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Reading Time: 5 minutes

Just in time for Halloween, Investvine invites you to read up on the folklore and potentially real dangers of the top 10 monsters in the Philippines.

Tambaloslos1. Tambaloslos

If you’re wondering in the woods in the Philippines, you might come across a Tambaloslos. It’s a mythical creature that appears to be human but has an absurd cartoon like smile that stretches from ear to ear. A user by the name of hunospuno over at Deviant Art writes that a Tambaloslos is usually found in the Visayas and Mindanao regions. Book a flight to the Philippines, walk into the woods, and the creature shall appear, grinning largely with a big head. Once you see one, you will lose track of your direction, to which you will have to take off your clothes and put them on again inside out in order to find your way out of the woods. Failure to do so will result in being eaten alive.

Moral of the story: Never wander out alone in the woods.

Duwende2. Duwende (Dwarf)

Ayaw tamaki ang balay sa duwende kay tagaan ka nila og sakit (Don’t step on the house of the dwarf or else, they will inflict you with a disease)!”

Duwendes are small creatures that dish out either good or bad fortunes to humans. They come out at noon and nighttime from their trees, hills, houses and termite mounds of which they inhabit.

In Filipino culture, stepping on a termite mound is a big no-no, for the superstitious belief says that they are the kingdoms of dwarves.

Before you go outside to urinate, Filipinos will recant “tabi-tabi” (Visayan) or “tabi-tabi po” (Tagalog) as a means to desire an excuse to pee outside, and not bother or displease the inhabiting dwarves.

Sometimes Filipinos will leave food on the floor to appease troublesome dwarves who hide their belongings.

Moral of the story: Be grateful for the outside, and be careful where you walk and urinate.

mermaid-merman-sirena-scariest-creatures3. Okoy (Merman) / Sirena (Mermaid)

“Just when you are starting to enjoy your swim at the beach, your parents would say, Ayaw adto sa lawom kay birahon ka og Okoy (Don’t go to the deep part of the sea because a merman will grab you)!”

The Okoy is described as an a-typical mermaid, where the upper portion of the body is that of a human and the lower part has either webbed feet, scaly legs, or a fishtail.

Okoys drown humans and then eat them.

Moral of the story: Stay in the shallow end of the ocean or swimming pool.

Sigbin4. Sigbin

Ayaw na laag kung gabii na kay makakita ka og sigbin (Don’t go out if it’s already night time because you will see a Sigbin)!”

Imagine a goat without horns and very large ears, with a tail that can be used as a whip.

Singbin’s are described as creatures that hide in the shadows at night and feast upon human blood by sucking it out of them.

The creatures walk backward with their heads lowered between their hind legs, cloaking themselves with their power of invisibility, all while emitting nauseating odors.

During Holy Week, Sigbin’s rise from their lair and seek out children to kill, bearing their hearts like amulets.

Moral of the story: Don’t stay up too late.

Wak wak5. Wak Wak

Hala ka! Gabii na. Dagiton dyud ka sa Wak Wak kung mag sige pa ka og laag (Watch out! It’s already nighttime. A Wakwak might seize you)!”

The Wak Wak is a vampiric, bird-like creature in Philippine mythology. It is said to snatch humans at night as prey, similar to the Manananggal in rural areas of the Philippines, due to its ability to fly.

The sound of a Wak Wak is usually associated with the presence of an Unglu (vampire) or Ungo (ghost or monster). It is also believed that this monster is called “Wak Wak” due to this sound it makes when it flaps its wings while flying.

Moral of the story: Don’t go walk around past night.

Santilmo6. Santilmo

Kung laagan kaayo ka sa gabii, makasugat ka og Santilmo (When you go out at night, you might come across a Santilmo).”

Santilmos are balls of fire that fly around, chase after people and scare the hell out of them..

It is described by Unexplained Mysteries as an apparition that takes on the appearance of a flame that are believed to be spirits of the dead and tend to lead the people who see them astray.

Moral of the story: Don’t play with fire.

Manananggal7. Manananggal

Nagbutang dyud og daghan na asin akong bana sa tanan namong bintana og nagbitay og daghan na ahos para dili daw makasulod ang manananggal sa amo (My husband placed a lot of salt on our windows and hang lots of garlic so that the Manananggal cannot enter our house).”

Manananggals are separated from their torsos, flying around at night with wings sprouted out of their backs. When pregnant women sleep, Manananggals seek them out to devour their baby’s hearts, using their long proboscis-like tongues to suck out their blood.

Like vampires, garlic (and salt) is used to ward them off.

Moral of the story:  If you’re pregnant, sleep correctly.

whitelady8. White Lady / Black Lady

The White lady is a female ghost associated with a tragic death in a local area. White ladies are typically ghoulish pale female ghosts who appear before you when you’re alone. White Ladies are believed to be harmless, but their counterparts, Black Ladies, are more violent.

The most prominent one is the White Lady of Balete Drive in Quezon City. It is said that it is the ghost of a long-haired woman in a white dress, who according to legend, died in a car accident while driving along Balete Drive. Most stories about her were told by taxi drivers doing the graveyard shift, such as the one where a taxi crosses Balete Drive, and a very beautiful woman is asking for a ride. The cabbie looks behind and sees the woman’s face was full of blood and bruises, causing him to abandon his taxi in horror.

Moral of the story: Be kind and vigilant.

kapre9. Kapre

Kapres are gigantic humanoid like creatures that hang around in trees and puff on gigantic cigars. They are thought to be harmless, their size is used to intimidate passersby in respecting the trees they live in.

Kapres may make contact with people to offer friendship, or if it is attracted to a woman. If a Kapre befriends any human, especially because of love, the Kapre will consistently follow its “love interest” throughout life. Also, if one is a friend of the Kapre then that person has the ability to see it and if they were to sit on it then any other person could see it.

Moral of the story: Respect mother nature.

Engkanto10. Engkanto

Much like many of the other aforementioned cryptic creatures, Engkantos live in the forest and have human like features.

If displeased, they inflict pain on people, but are also known to kidnap and fall in love with their victims as well.

Amulets will keep Engkantos away.

Moral of the story: Don’t go walking around in forests alone.

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Reading Time: 5 minutes

Just in time for Halloween, Investvine invites you to read up on the folklore and potentially real dangers of the top 10 monsters in the Philippines.

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Just in time for Halloween, Investvine invites you to read up on the folklore and potentially real dangers of the top 10 monsters in the Philippines.

Tambaloslos1. Tambaloslos

If you’re wondering in the woods in the Philippines, you might come across a Tambaloslos. It’s a mythical creature that appears to be human but has an absurd cartoon like smile that stretches from ear to ear. A user by the name of hunospuno over at Deviant Art writes that a Tambaloslos is usually found in the Visayas and Mindanao regions. Book a flight to the Philippines, walk into the woods, and the creature shall appear, grinning largely with a big head. Once you see one, you will lose track of your direction, to which you will have to take off your clothes and put them on again inside out in order to find your way out of the woods. Failure to do so will result in being eaten alive.

Moral of the story: Never wander out alone in the woods.

Duwende2. Duwende (Dwarf)

Ayaw tamaki ang balay sa duwende kay tagaan ka nila og sakit (Don’t step on the house of the dwarf or else, they will inflict you with a disease)!”

Duwendes are small creatures that dish out either good or bad fortunes to humans. They come out at noon and nighttime from their trees, hills, houses and termite mounds of which they inhabit.

In Filipino culture, stepping on a termite mound is a big no-no, for the superstitious belief says that they are the kingdoms of dwarves.

Before you go outside to urinate, Filipinos will recant “tabi-tabi” (Visayan) or “tabi-tabi po” (Tagalog) as a means to desire an excuse to pee outside, and not bother or displease the inhabiting dwarves.

Sometimes Filipinos will leave food on the floor to appease troublesome dwarves who hide their belongings.

Moral of the story: Be grateful for the outside, and be careful where you walk and urinate.

mermaid-merman-sirena-scariest-creatures3. Okoy (Merman) / Sirena (Mermaid)

“Just when you are starting to enjoy your swim at the beach, your parents would say, Ayaw adto sa lawom kay birahon ka og Okoy (Don’t go to the deep part of the sea because a merman will grab you)!”

The Okoy is described as an a-typical mermaid, where the upper portion of the body is that of a human and the lower part has either webbed feet, scaly legs, or a fishtail.

Okoys drown humans and then eat them.

Moral of the story: Stay in the shallow end of the ocean or swimming pool.

Sigbin4. Sigbin

Ayaw na laag kung gabii na kay makakita ka og sigbin (Don’t go out if it’s already night time because you will see a Sigbin)!”

Imagine a goat without horns and very large ears, with a tail that can be used as a whip.

Singbin’s are described as creatures that hide in the shadows at night and feast upon human blood by sucking it out of them.

The creatures walk backward with their heads lowered between their hind legs, cloaking themselves with their power of invisibility, all while emitting nauseating odors.

During Holy Week, Sigbin’s rise from their lair and seek out children to kill, bearing their hearts like amulets.

Moral of the story: Don’t stay up too late.

Wak wak5. Wak Wak

Hala ka! Gabii na. Dagiton dyud ka sa Wak Wak kung mag sige pa ka og laag (Watch out! It’s already nighttime. A Wakwak might seize you)!”

The Wak Wak is a vampiric, bird-like creature in Philippine mythology. It is said to snatch humans at night as prey, similar to the Manananggal in rural areas of the Philippines, due to its ability to fly.

The sound of a Wak Wak is usually associated with the presence of an Unglu (vampire) or Ungo (ghost or monster). It is also believed that this monster is called “Wak Wak” due to this sound it makes when it flaps its wings while flying.

Moral of the story: Don’t go walk around past night.

Santilmo6. Santilmo

Kung laagan kaayo ka sa gabii, makasugat ka og Santilmo (When you go out at night, you might come across a Santilmo).”

Santilmos are balls of fire that fly around, chase after people and scare the hell out of them..

It is described by Unexplained Mysteries as an apparition that takes on the appearance of a flame that are believed to be spirits of the dead and tend to lead the people who see them astray.

Moral of the story: Don’t play with fire.

Manananggal7. Manananggal

Nagbutang dyud og daghan na asin akong bana sa tanan namong bintana og nagbitay og daghan na ahos para dili daw makasulod ang manananggal sa amo (My husband placed a lot of salt on our windows and hang lots of garlic so that the Manananggal cannot enter our house).”

Manananggals are separated from their torsos, flying around at night with wings sprouted out of their backs. When pregnant women sleep, Manananggals seek them out to devour their baby’s hearts, using their long proboscis-like tongues to suck out their blood.

Like vampires, garlic (and salt) is used to ward them off.

Moral of the story:  If you’re pregnant, sleep correctly.

whitelady8. White Lady / Black Lady

The White lady is a female ghost associated with a tragic death in a local area. White ladies are typically ghoulish pale female ghosts who appear before you when you’re alone. White Ladies are believed to be harmless, but their counterparts, Black Ladies, are more violent.

The most prominent one is the White Lady of Balete Drive in Quezon City. It is said that it is the ghost of a long-haired woman in a white dress, who according to legend, died in a car accident while driving along Balete Drive. Most stories about her were told by taxi drivers doing the graveyard shift, such as the one where a taxi crosses Balete Drive, and a very beautiful woman is asking for a ride. The cabbie looks behind and sees the woman’s face was full of blood and bruises, causing him to abandon his taxi in horror.

Moral of the story: Be kind and vigilant.

kapre9. Kapre

Kapres are gigantic humanoid like creatures that hang around in trees and puff on gigantic cigars. They are thought to be harmless, their size is used to intimidate passersby in respecting the trees they live in.

Kapres may make contact with people to offer friendship, or if it is attracted to a woman. If a Kapre befriends any human, especially because of love, the Kapre will consistently follow its “love interest” throughout life. Also, if one is a friend of the Kapre then that person has the ability to see it and if they were to sit on it then any other person could see it.

Moral of the story: Respect mother nature.

Engkanto10. Engkanto

Much like many of the other aforementioned cryptic creatures, Engkantos live in the forest and have human like features.

If displeased, they inflict pain on people, but are also known to kidnap and fall in love with their victims as well.

Amulets will keep Engkantos away.

Moral of the story: Don’t go walking around in forests alone.

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