Haze-related sicknesses plague Singapore

Reading Time: 1 minute

singapore-haze_8“My son just got his first asthma attack in years because of this. Indonesia needs to man up,” a Singaporean citizens outraged on his LinkedIn account yesterday, June 21, the day a thick haze covering the city-state hit a record high, already causing losses to the retail and tourism sector of an estimated 10 per cent.

Since the haze, an annual phenomenon caused by crop burning in Indonesia, descended on Singapore earlier in the week, local hospitals have recorded a rise in patients afflicted by eye irritation, chest pain and other haze-related conditions, local media has reported.

As a result, the city-state has already observed that many workers at taking sick leave.

Schools in the education-centric country have been forced to cancel outdoor activities.

Furthermore, on June 21 face masks and air purifiers sold out at pharmacies and department store across Singapore as the Pollutant Standard Index, a measure of air quality, surged to a record high of 401, almost double those during Southeast Asia’s prolonged haze crisis in 1997.

Faced with the peril of living with Beijing-style smog for another two weeks, Singaporeans have, however, taken to social media to attempt to laugh off the health hazard.

“Singapore is small, and barely visible on the world map. Now [it’s] got haze,” tweeted Sg SchoolProblems.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 1 minute

“My son just got his first asthma attack in years because of this. Indonesia needs to man up,” a Singaporean citizens outraged on his LinkedIn account yesterday, June 21, the day a thick haze covering the city-state hit a record high, already causing losses to the retail and tourism sector of an estimated 10 per cent.

Reading Time: 1 minute

singapore-haze_8“My son just got his first asthma attack in years because of this. Indonesia needs to man up,” a Singaporean citizens outraged on his LinkedIn account yesterday, June 21, the day a thick haze covering the city-state hit a record high, already causing losses to the retail and tourism sector of an estimated 10 per cent.

Since the haze, an annual phenomenon caused by crop burning in Indonesia, descended on Singapore earlier in the week, local hospitals have recorded a rise in patients afflicted by eye irritation, chest pain and other haze-related conditions, local media has reported.

As a result, the city-state has already observed that many workers at taking sick leave.

Schools in the education-centric country have been forced to cancel outdoor activities.

Furthermore, on June 21 face masks and air purifiers sold out at pharmacies and department store across Singapore as the Pollutant Standard Index, a measure of air quality, surged to a record high of 401, almost double those during Southeast Asia’s prolonged haze crisis in 1997.

Faced with the peril of living with Beijing-style smog for another two weeks, Singaporeans have, however, taken to social media to attempt to laugh off the health hazard.

“Singapore is small, and barely visible on the world map. Now [it’s] got haze,” tweeted Sg SchoolProblems.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid