Healthtech startups to change Indonesia’s healthcare landscape

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Healthtech Startups To Change Indonesia's Healthcare Landscape

Indonesia, a country notoriously underequipped with hospitals and medical services and suffering from a chronic shortage of doctors and health professionals, is being seen as the next big playing ground for digital health technology, or healthtech.

The country’s ratio of hospital beds to population is the lowest in Southeast Asia and among the lowest in the world, while the average bed occupancy rate of 64 per cent in recent years was well below the Ministry of Health’s ideal ratio of between 80 per cent and 85 per cent.

Adding to that, there is an extremely uneven geographical distribution of medical professionals because many doctors are reluctant to practice in rural areas, according to a recent EY report. As a result, nearly 50 per cent of all healthcare professionals in Indonesia disproportionately practice on the islands of Java and Bali.

Insufficient health infrastructure, income disparities, shortage of private health insurance and over-dependence on foreign healthcare are further challenges faced by the Indonesian healthcare sector in a country with more than 13,000 islands and moderate transport infrastructure.

On the other hand, in Indonesia the number of smartphone users is estimated to be more than 100 million people or close to 40 per cent of the population. As a measure to improve patient outcomes and transform the healthcare sector, Indonesia’s government and private businesses are therefore adopting technology-based solutions and are increasingly looking into healthtech solutions which are receiving plenty of interest and funding from foreign countries too.

This has encouraged Indonesia’s Social Security Agency for Health, a government entity responsible for providing health care insurance to all Indonesian citizen, to develop a mobile health application. In 2017, the agency launched a mobile application called Mobile National Health Insurance to easily access services by the government. Users can find all information related to participant data, including medical history, billing information, availability of health care facilities, such as hospital beds, medical staff and doctors. Another service is a mobile cardiac emergency application called iHeart which allows patients to send their blood pressure and heart rate information to hospitals and emergency care units to prevent critical situations.

In the private sector, Indonesia’s homegrown ride-hailing company Go-Jek has been supporting an application called Halodoc, a platform connecting patients with doctors, insurances, labs and pharmacies in one simple mobile application.

In March 2019, Halodoc announced that it had raised $65 million in Series B funding from investors in Singapore, South Korea and China, and this funding will be utilised to improve the platform and expand partnerships with healthcare facilities in Indonesia. Currently. Halodoc currently has about two million users and works with Go-Jek’s two-million strong fleet to connect patients with about 20,000 health professionals and 1,300 pharmacies in its partner network,

In April 2019, Medigo, a Jakarta-based HealthTech start-up established in May 2018, announced that it has received seed funding from domestic venture fund Venturra Discovery. Medigo aims to connect patients, doctors, insurance as well as the government healthcare facilities in Indonesia.

Another interesting example is an internet of things-driven service called Sahabat Bunda (A Mom’s Best Friend) that empowers rural midwives to record fetal heartbeat and uterine contractions during pregnancy via smartphone. The results are sent automatically to doctors on standby for further analysis and sent back to the midwife shortly thereafter. The goal of this company is to lower the mortality rate of mothers and babies in poor and rural Indonesia via an affordable cardiotocography device, accurate and timely diagnosis, and better governance of the process overall.

An app called Alodokter allows its users to chat with a doctor without a waitlist. They will answer medical questions accurately and for free.

Medi-Call is a mobile application which connects a healthcare provider with a patient in need for home visit service. Both parties will agree on a meeting and the contacted healthcare professional will arrive at the location agreed upon.

Dokter.id serves its users by providing healthcare information that is trending. One feature included is a “Symptom Checker” which helps users to check their bodies step by step.

Medika also allows its users to consult with doctors of their choice. This app allows users to find their nearest hospitals, check the doctors’ schedules and create appointments.

YesDok is an app enabling patients to contact experienced doctors anytime in 24 hours via video call, voice call or chat. They will diagnose YesDok users and provide medicine recommendation.

TeleCTG s a simplified cardiotocography device that provides cost-effective, portable and real-time data captured from a patient’s cardiovascular system for online diagnosis.

Tanyadok provides health information, content and consultations from professional doctors, supported by a medical editorial team and hundreds of contributing doctors such as general physicians and experts.

K24Klik is one example for the growing number of online pharmacies. After a consultation, drug orders are shipped quickly from the nearest participating pharmacy. If there’s no pharmacy anywhere close to user’s location, some apps offer one-day delivery and courier packages. Users can also redeem doctor prescriptions online.

Those are just some examples of digital health portals in Indonesia, and more are expected to emerge.

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Indonesia, a country notoriously underequipped with hospitals and medical services and suffering from a chronic shortage of doctors and health professionals, is being seen as the next big playing ground for digital health technology, or healthtech. The country’s ratio of hospital beds to population is the lowest in Southeast Asia and among the lowest in the world, while the average bed occupancy rate of 64 per cent in recent years was well below the Ministry of Health’s ideal ratio of between 80 per cent and 85 per cent. Adding to that, there is an extremely uneven geographical distribution of medical...

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Healthtech Startups To Change Indonesia's Healthcare Landscape

Indonesia, a country notoriously underequipped with hospitals and medical services and suffering from a chronic shortage of doctors and health professionals, is being seen as the next big playing ground for digital health technology, or healthtech.

The country’s ratio of hospital beds to population is the lowest in Southeast Asia and among the lowest in the world, while the average bed occupancy rate of 64 per cent in recent years was well below the Ministry of Health’s ideal ratio of between 80 per cent and 85 per cent.

Adding to that, there is an extremely uneven geographical distribution of medical professionals because many doctors are reluctant to practice in rural areas, according to a recent EY report. As a result, nearly 50 per cent of all healthcare professionals in Indonesia disproportionately practice on the islands of Java and Bali.

Insufficient health infrastructure, income disparities, shortage of private health insurance and over-dependence on foreign healthcare are further challenges faced by the Indonesian healthcare sector in a country with more than 13,000 islands and moderate transport infrastructure.

On the other hand, in Indonesia the number of smartphone users is estimated to be more than 100 million people or close to 40 per cent of the population. As a measure to improve patient outcomes and transform the healthcare sector, Indonesia’s government and private businesses are therefore adopting technology-based solutions and are increasingly looking into healthtech solutions which are receiving plenty of interest and funding from foreign countries too.

This has encouraged Indonesia’s Social Security Agency for Health, a government entity responsible for providing health care insurance to all Indonesian citizen, to develop a mobile health application. In 2017, the agency launched a mobile application called Mobile National Health Insurance to easily access services by the government. Users can find all information related to participant data, including medical history, billing information, availability of health care facilities, such as hospital beds, medical staff and doctors. Another service is a mobile cardiac emergency application called iHeart which allows patients to send their blood pressure and heart rate information to hospitals and emergency care units to prevent critical situations.

In the private sector, Indonesia’s homegrown ride-hailing company Go-Jek has been supporting an application called Halodoc, a platform connecting patients with doctors, insurances, labs and pharmacies in one simple mobile application.

In March 2019, Halodoc announced that it had raised $65 million in Series B funding from investors in Singapore, South Korea and China, and this funding will be utilised to improve the platform and expand partnerships with healthcare facilities in Indonesia. Currently. Halodoc currently has about two million users and works with Go-Jek’s two-million strong fleet to connect patients with about 20,000 health professionals and 1,300 pharmacies in its partner network,

In April 2019, Medigo, a Jakarta-based HealthTech start-up established in May 2018, announced that it has received seed funding from domestic venture fund Venturra Discovery. Medigo aims to connect patients, doctors, insurance as well as the government healthcare facilities in Indonesia.

Another interesting example is an internet of things-driven service called Sahabat Bunda (A Mom’s Best Friend) that empowers rural midwives to record fetal heartbeat and uterine contractions during pregnancy via smartphone. The results are sent automatically to doctors on standby for further analysis and sent back to the midwife shortly thereafter. The goal of this company is to lower the mortality rate of mothers and babies in poor and rural Indonesia via an affordable cardiotocography device, accurate and timely diagnosis, and better governance of the process overall.

An app called Alodokter allows its users to chat with a doctor without a waitlist. They will answer medical questions accurately and for free.

Medi-Call is a mobile application which connects a healthcare provider with a patient in need for home visit service. Both parties will agree on a meeting and the contacted healthcare professional will arrive at the location agreed upon.

Dokter.id serves its users by providing healthcare information that is trending. One feature included is a “Symptom Checker” which helps users to check their bodies step by step.

Medika also allows its users to consult with doctors of their choice. This app allows users to find their nearest hospitals, check the doctors’ schedules and create appointments.

YesDok is an app enabling patients to contact experienced doctors anytime in 24 hours via video call, voice call or chat. They will diagnose YesDok users and provide medicine recommendation.

TeleCTG s a simplified cardiotocography device that provides cost-effective, portable and real-time data captured from a patient’s cardiovascular system for online diagnosis.

Tanyadok provides health information, content and consultations from professional doctors, supported by a medical editorial team and hundreds of contributing doctors such as general physicians and experts.

K24Klik is one example for the growing number of online pharmacies. After a consultation, drug orders are shipped quickly from the nearest participating pharmacy. If there’s no pharmacy anywhere close to user’s location, some apps offer one-day delivery and courier packages. Users can also redeem doctor prescriptions online.

Those are just some examples of digital health portals in Indonesia, and more are expected to emerge.

Share your vote!


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