Hong Kong declares sanctions against the Philippines

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Manila hostage crisis, August 23, 2010
Manila hostage crisis, August 23, 2010

The Hong Kong government, backed by Beijing, on January 29 declared sanctions against the Philippines since Manila failed to make a formal apology and meet all other demands by families of victims died in a hostage crisis three years ago, China Daily reported.

Chief Executive CY Leung announced that the sanctions will take effect on February 5 by suspending 14-day visa-free treatment for holders of diplomatic and official passports of the Republic of the Philippines. According to Leung, the suspension of the courtesy treatment would be just the first-phase measure of a series of sanctions.

The deadline for negotiation with the Philippines had run out and the Philippine government still had not satisfied all the demands claimed by the injured and families of the victims, especially a formal apology, Leung said.

“The Hong Kong government and the families consider that the latest Philippine response is unacceptable,” he said in a press conference held by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government, noting that his government’s handling of the issue was backed by the central government.

According to Leung, there are about 700 to 800 Philippine individuals holding diplomatic or official passports travel to Hong Kong each year. According to Secretary for Security Lai Tung- kwok, the accredited Philippine consular officials in Hong Kong will not be affected.

When the sanction takes effect, holders of those passports who plan to visit Hong Kong will have to apply for a visa beforehand in accordance with normal procedures in Hong Kong’s Immigration Department or China’s diplomatic and consular missions overseas.

A dismissed local police officer, Rolando Mendoza, hijacked a tourist bus carrying 25 people in Manila on August 23, 2010. Mendoza and eight Hong Kong tourists were killed, and seven injured during the tragedy. The injured and families of the victims have claimed four demands: official apology, compensation, punishing accountable officials for the handling in a bungled rescue attempt, as well as improving security measures for tourists in the Philippines.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Manila hostage crisis, August 23, 2010

The Hong Kong government, backed by Beijing, on January 29 declared sanctions against the Philippines since Manila failed to make a formal apology and meet all other demands by families of victims died in a hostage crisis three years ago, China Daily reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Manila hostage crisis, August 23, 2010
Manila hostage crisis, August 23, 2010

The Hong Kong government, backed by Beijing, on January 29 declared sanctions against the Philippines since Manila failed to make a formal apology and meet all other demands by families of victims died in a hostage crisis three years ago, China Daily reported.

Chief Executive CY Leung announced that the sanctions will take effect on February 5 by suspending 14-day visa-free treatment for holders of diplomatic and official passports of the Republic of the Philippines. According to Leung, the suspension of the courtesy treatment would be just the first-phase measure of a series of sanctions.

The deadline for negotiation with the Philippines had run out and the Philippine government still had not satisfied all the demands claimed by the injured and families of the victims, especially a formal apology, Leung said.

“The Hong Kong government and the families consider that the latest Philippine response is unacceptable,” he said in a press conference held by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government, noting that his government’s handling of the issue was backed by the central government.

According to Leung, there are about 700 to 800 Philippine individuals holding diplomatic or official passports travel to Hong Kong each year. According to Secretary for Security Lai Tung- kwok, the accredited Philippine consular officials in Hong Kong will not be affected.

When the sanction takes effect, holders of those passports who plan to visit Hong Kong will have to apply for a visa beforehand in accordance with normal procedures in Hong Kong’s Immigration Department or China’s diplomatic and consular missions overseas.

A dismissed local police officer, Rolando Mendoza, hijacked a tourist bus carrying 25 people in Manila on August 23, 2010. Mendoza and eight Hong Kong tourists were killed, and seven injured during the tragedy. The injured and families of the victims have claimed four demands: official apology, compensation, punishing accountable officials for the handling in a bungled rescue attempt, as well as improving security measures for tourists in the Philippines.

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