Myanmar gets telemedicine service

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Indian healthcare provider Apollo Group of Hospitals has launched its telemedicine service in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, this month.

The telemedicine service will be used to provide medical consultation to Myanmar physicians, the group said in a release.

Apollo will help facilitate ready access to specialists for referrals, consultation, second opinions, reviews and post treatment follow-ups, as well as providing opportunities to continue medical education via distance, according to Managing Director Preetha Reddy.

The country’s fledging healthcare system will need this support as it suffers from a serious dearth of human capital. According to statistics from the World Health Organisation, Myanmar has 4.6 physicians per 10,000 people (compared to 11.4 in the Philippines) and a severely negligible amount of pharmaceutical professionals.

Healthcare infrastructure also remains a critical issue as the government only dedicates $17 per capita to the development of the industry, World Bank statistics show.

India’s telemedicine service is also likely to be welcomed by initiatives from local psychologists who have recently kick-started a pilot programme to address mental health issues that go largely unchecked throughout one of Asia’s poorest countries.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Indian healthcare provider Apollo Group of Hospitals has launched its telemedicine service in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, this month.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Indian healthcare provider Apollo Group of Hospitals has launched its telemedicine service in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, this month.

The telemedicine service will be used to provide medical consultation to Myanmar physicians, the group said in a release.

Apollo will help facilitate ready access to specialists for referrals, consultation, second opinions, reviews and post treatment follow-ups, as well as providing opportunities to continue medical education via distance, according to Managing Director Preetha Reddy.

The country’s fledging healthcare system will need this support as it suffers from a serious dearth of human capital. According to statistics from the World Health Organisation, Myanmar has 4.6 physicians per 10,000 people (compared to 11.4 in the Philippines) and a severely negligible amount of pharmaceutical professionals.

Healthcare infrastructure also remains a critical issue as the government only dedicates $17 per capita to the development of the industry, World Bank statistics show.

India’s telemedicine service is also likely to be welcomed by initiatives from local psychologists who have recently kick-started a pilot programme to address mental health issues that go largely unchecked throughout one of Asia’s poorest countries.

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