Indonesia tourism fears Miss World closing

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Miss world no bikini
The Miss World Organisation said it would not be “disrespectful” to Indonesian culture and has already banned bikinis for the 2013 pageant

Heated debates on the Miss World beauty pageant slated to be held in September 2013 in Indonesia have caused concerns that the country might lose out on significant event revenues and the much-needed opportunity to promote Indonesia as a tourism destination.

The contest, to be held in the convention town of Sintul, West Java, some 50 kilometers south of Jakarta, and also in Nusa Dua, Bali, has been the target of heavy criticism from Muslim groups and Islamic opinion leaders who voiced anger that the bikini session in the show would be an affront to local culture and moral attitudes. They also said the event would promote “hedonism, materialism, and consumerism” and was “nothing but an excuse to show women’s body parts that should remain covered.”

Organisers already made the concession that – for the first time in the contest’s 62-year history – bikinis will be banned in the swimwear session and all participants will use one piece of swimsuit plus a traditional sarong from the belly and below as a compromise with local culture.

However, hardline Islamists on June 7 have vowed to use force to shut down the entire pageant. saying that the beauty contest was “too American” and “not suitable for Indonesia,” which is home to the world’s largest Muslim population.

“We will disband the event, nicely at first or with force if they insist. You can elaborate that statement yourself,” a hardline group spokesperson said on ABC News.

“The Miss World pageant… will affect the future generation, their morality and characters will be destroyed,” he said.

“The committee of this pageant should not force their will on us, because if they do, they will experience losses, material losses and other loses.”

Tourism officials, on the other hand, reminded of the big opportunity to promote Indonesia as a tourism destination, as the pageant would be covered by hundreds of international media representatives, reaching an audience of millions around the world. Aside from that, the Miss World contest would also raise sizeable funds for children’s charities in Indonesia under its “Beauty with a Purpose” programme, they argued.

The annual final of the contest lasts typically a month and includes several preliminary galas, dinners, balls and activities, ending in a globally broadcast final show, all of which boosts event tourism revenues. The contest has also been credited with directly influencing a dramatic increase in tourism in China, which hosted the Miss World finals in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012.

The Miss World Organisation has so far not reacted to the latest threats. Its chairwoman Julia Morley earlier said that the organisation does not want to be “disrespectful” to Indonesia.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Miss World Organisation said it would not be “disrespectful” to Indonesian culture and has already banned bikinis for the 2013 pageant

Heated debates on the Miss World beauty pageant slated to be held in September 2013 in Indonesia have caused concerns that the country might lose out on significant event revenues and the much-needed opportunity to promote Indonesia as a tourism destination.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Miss world no bikini
The Miss World Organisation said it would not be “disrespectful” to Indonesian culture and has already banned bikinis for the 2013 pageant

Heated debates on the Miss World beauty pageant slated to be held in September 2013 in Indonesia have caused concerns that the country might lose out on significant event revenues and the much-needed opportunity to promote Indonesia as a tourism destination.

The contest, to be held in the convention town of Sintul, West Java, some 50 kilometers south of Jakarta, and also in Nusa Dua, Bali, has been the target of heavy criticism from Muslim groups and Islamic opinion leaders who voiced anger that the bikini session in the show would be an affront to local culture and moral attitudes. They also said the event would promote “hedonism, materialism, and consumerism” and was “nothing but an excuse to show women’s body parts that should remain covered.”

Organisers already made the concession that – for the first time in the contest’s 62-year history – bikinis will be banned in the swimwear session and all participants will use one piece of swimsuit plus a traditional sarong from the belly and below as a compromise with local culture.

However, hardline Islamists on June 7 have vowed to use force to shut down the entire pageant. saying that the beauty contest was “too American” and “not suitable for Indonesia,” which is home to the world’s largest Muslim population.

“We will disband the event, nicely at first or with force if they insist. You can elaborate that statement yourself,” a hardline group spokesperson said on ABC News.

“The Miss World pageant… will affect the future generation, their morality and characters will be destroyed,” he said.

“The committee of this pageant should not force their will on us, because if they do, they will experience losses, material losses and other loses.”

Tourism officials, on the other hand, reminded of the big opportunity to promote Indonesia as a tourism destination, as the pageant would be covered by hundreds of international media representatives, reaching an audience of millions around the world. Aside from that, the Miss World contest would also raise sizeable funds for children’s charities in Indonesia under its “Beauty with a Purpose” programme, they argued.

The annual final of the contest lasts typically a month and includes several preliminary galas, dinners, balls and activities, ending in a globally broadcast final show, all of which boosts event tourism revenues. The contest has also been credited with directly influencing a dramatic increase in tourism in China, which hosted the Miss World finals in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012.

The Miss World Organisation has so far not reacted to the latest threats. Its chairwoman Julia Morley earlier said that the organisation does not want to be “disrespectful” to Indonesia.

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