Indonesia seeks solar power partners

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solar powerThe Indonesian government has set aside $103 million for the development of 36 solar energy projects in 2013 through the assistance of partners.

According to Alihudin Sitompul, the renewable energy director at the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, the government is actively seeking partners to enter into joint ventures to develop the new solar plants due to financial and technical constraints.

“So far, our policies regarding the development of solar power plants are already good. However, our partners should be able to decide whether the [solar plant projects] are feasible or not, so that they do not force themselves to do them,” Sitompul said in the Energy Business Review.

Indonesia current operates 117 solar plants, and the new development plan will bring the total to 153.

In 2012, Indonesia spent $71.8 million investing in 17 new solar plants.

Global solar power capacity currently measures 20 gigawatts, marking a significant increase from negligible levels just years ago, along with other renewables, such as wind, which now measures 82 gigawatts.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

The Indonesian government has set aside $103 million for the development of 36 solar energy projects in 2013 through the assistance of partners.

Reading Time: 1 minute

solar powerThe Indonesian government has set aside $103 million for the development of 36 solar energy projects in 2013 through the assistance of partners.

According to Alihudin Sitompul, the renewable energy director at the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, the government is actively seeking partners to enter into joint ventures to develop the new solar plants due to financial and technical constraints.

“So far, our policies regarding the development of solar power plants are already good. However, our partners should be able to decide whether the [solar plant projects] are feasible or not, so that they do not force themselves to do them,” Sitompul said in the Energy Business Review.

Indonesia current operates 117 solar plants, and the new development plan will bring the total to 153.

In 2012, Indonesia spent $71.8 million investing in 17 new solar plants.

Global solar power capacity currently measures 20 gigawatts, marking a significant increase from negligible levels just years ago, along with other renewables, such as wind, which now measures 82 gigawatts.

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