Indonesians most bullish investors in Asia

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A recent index by Manulife Financial has revealed that Indonesians are the most bullish in Asia. The high optimism in ASEAN’s largest economy comes from perceived positivity in real estate and stock investments, Manulife said.

Manulife, a global fund manager, ranks Malaysia closely after Indonesia, with Hong Kong investor sentiment forced into the negative zone, the Wall Street Journal detailed (see graph).

When surveyed, some 80 per cent of Indonesian investors believe that they will be better off in two years than they are today.

Property remains the asset class of choice for the majority of Asian investors.

The survey interviewed 3,500 investors across Asia in the mid-April to May period. However, perhaps skewing the scores, the interviews for the most optimistic countries were conducted face to face, while others answered via email.

Interestingly, the global fund manager issued a warning that claimed investors in ASEAN’s largest economies held too much cash, namely Singapore and Malaysia.

The same goes for Indonesians. Cash is the primary holding of Indonesian investors, making up on average 41 per cent of their total assets.

Only 8 per cent of Asian investors surveyed said they thought their cash holdings were too high.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Click to enlarge

A recent index by Manulife Financial has revealed that Indonesians are the most bullish in Asia. The high optimism in ASEAN’s largest economy comes from perceived positivity in real estate and stock investments, Manulife said.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Manulife graph
Click to enlarge

A recent index by Manulife Financial has revealed that Indonesians are the most bullish in Asia. The high optimism in ASEAN’s largest economy comes from perceived positivity in real estate and stock investments, Manulife said.

Manulife, a global fund manager, ranks Malaysia closely after Indonesia, with Hong Kong investor sentiment forced into the negative zone, the Wall Street Journal detailed (see graph).

When surveyed, some 80 per cent of Indonesian investors believe that they will be better off in two years than they are today.

Property remains the asset class of choice for the majority of Asian investors.

The survey interviewed 3,500 investors across Asia in the mid-April to May period. However, perhaps skewing the scores, the interviews for the most optimistic countries were conducted face to face, while others answered via email.

Interestingly, the global fund manager issued a warning that claimed investors in ASEAN’s largest economies held too much cash, namely Singapore and Malaysia.

The same goes for Indonesians. Cash is the primary holding of Indonesian investors, making up on average 41 per cent of their total assets.

Only 8 per cent of Asian investors surveyed said they thought their cash holdings were too high.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
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