Indonesia’s President Widodo wins second term

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Indonesia’s President Widodo Wins Second Term

Indonesian President Joko Widodo has been elected for a second term, official results of the country’s presidential election held last month showed on May 21. It was a victory over his challenger, ultra-nationalist former General Prabowo Subianto, who aligned himself with Islamic hard-liners and now vowed to challenge the result in the country’s highest court.

The Election Commission said that Widodo won 55.5 per cent, or 85 million votes, in the April 17 election, while Subianto got 45.5 per cent, or 68 million.

Tens of thousands of police officers and soldiers were on high alert in Jakarta, the capital, anticipating protests from Subianto’s supporters. The Election Commission’s headquarters in central Jakarta were barricaded with razor wire and heavily guarded.

Declaring victory, Widodo said he and his running mate, conservative cleric Ma’ruf Amin, “will be the president and vice president of all the people in Indonesia.”

Widodo’s campaign highlighted his progress in poverty reduction and improving Indonesia’s inadequate infrastructure with new ports, toll roads, airports and mass rapid transit. A second term for Widodo, the first Indonesian president from outside the Jakarta elite, could further cement the country’s two decades of democratisation.

Once the election commission finalises the results on May 22, Subianto’s camp has three days to file a lawsuit contesting the outcome. Subianto had said before the official announcement that he would reject the result if it went against him.

“We are concerned about the enormous fraud committed in the general election that we have just carried out,” he said, urging supporters to stay peaceful and not resort to violence.

Subianto lost a similar challenge to the results after losing in the previous presidential election in 2014


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Indonesian President Joko Widodo has been elected for a second term, official results of the country's presidential election held last month showed on May 21. It was a victory over his challenger, ultra-nationalist former General Prabowo Subianto, who aligned himself with Islamic hard-liners and now vowed to challenge the result in the country’s highest court. The Election Commission said that Widodo won 55.5 per cent, or 85 million votes, in the April 17 election, while Subianto got 45.5 per cent, or 68 million. Tens of thousands of police officers and soldiers were on high alert in Jakarta, the capital, anticipating...

Reading Time: 1 minute

Indonesia’s President Widodo Wins Second Term

Indonesian President Joko Widodo has been elected for a second term, official results of the country’s presidential election held last month showed on May 21. It was a victory over his challenger, ultra-nationalist former General Prabowo Subianto, who aligned himself with Islamic hard-liners and now vowed to challenge the result in the country’s highest court.

The Election Commission said that Widodo won 55.5 per cent, or 85 million votes, in the April 17 election, while Subianto got 45.5 per cent, or 68 million.

Tens of thousands of police officers and soldiers were on high alert in Jakarta, the capital, anticipating protests from Subianto’s supporters. The Election Commission’s headquarters in central Jakarta were barricaded with razor wire and heavily guarded.

Declaring victory, Widodo said he and his running mate, conservative cleric Ma’ruf Amin, “will be the president and vice president of all the people in Indonesia.”

Widodo’s campaign highlighted his progress in poverty reduction and improving Indonesia’s inadequate infrastructure with new ports, toll roads, airports and mass rapid transit. A second term for Widodo, the first Indonesian president from outside the Jakarta elite, could further cement the country’s two decades of democratisation.

Once the election commission finalises the results on May 22, Subianto’s camp has three days to file a lawsuit contesting the outcome. Subianto had said before the official announcement that he would reject the result if it went against him.

“We are concerned about the enormous fraud committed in the general election that we have just carried out,” he said, urging supporters to stay peaceful and not resort to violence.

Subianto lost a similar challenge to the results after losing in the previous presidential election in 2014


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