Jakarta counts on Big Data for smart infrastructure management

Reading Time: 2 minutes

jakartaJakarta, the capital of Indonesia and city of nearly 10 million, will be holding its first open data challenge, HackJakarta, on April, 26,according to Setiaji, Head of Jakarta’s Information Development Planning Center, according to FutureGov news portal.

He said that Jakarta is using open government and Big Data to help its city managers make more informed decisions. HackJakarta, which Setiaji is leading, is the first time that the city is opening up over 50 data sets in machine readable format and a crucial initiative as Indonesia is co-chairing the Open Government Partnership.

Setiaji also noted Jakarta’s Intelligent Transport System which connects to the traffic management center and local police for CCTV and traffic signals. The system was adapted from Australia. Residents are now able to get public transport information and the city is able to prioritise and manage its public transportation. There are currently around 1,000 CCTV cameras in Jakarta, and the number is expected to grow to 5,000 in an aim to make Jakarta a safer city.

“We’re only starting now and we will definitely improve in the future,” Setiaji said.

With 13 rivers flowing into Jakarta, flood management is another important area for Big Data applications. Jakarta’s new early warning system monitors risk indicators so that agencies are able to take quick action before the situation escalates.

The city sees around 15,000 projects being implemented every year and numerous parameters need to be taken into account for managing these projects. Jakarta’s project monitoring system combines all the parameters into one of three possible signals (similar to red, yellow or green on a traffic signal) so that city managers are able to quickly interpret the data and take action.

A big challenge for Jakarta’s city government is extracting value from and taking action on the huge volumes of data in the city systems, Setiaji stated. Another aspect that Jakarta’s government is improving on is collaboration between agencies.

As Jakarta travels down its Smart City roadmap, leapfrog changes must take place for the city to reach its ultimate goal, Setiaji said. A crucial step towards this is the city’s Intelligent Operations Centre (IOC), which will serve as the command and control centre bringing together different data sources for a holistic view of movements in the city.

Jakarta’s IOC takes inspiration from Rio de Janeiro’s and will leverage sensors to collect data, and combine and analyse it to automate collaborative response. Setiaji highlighted three main stages in the IOC action plan – leverage information, anticipate problems and coordinate responses.

“The IOC is the first step toward a smarter city because 40 per cent of city challenges lie in emergency response systems which test the agencies’ ability to coordinate their actions,” Setiaji noted. The IOC will ultimately enable agencies to prepare and forecast changes in urban dynamics.

An important lesson Setiaji shared is that inspirational leadership is important for the success of the Smart City vision, along with good communication, fair negotiation and consistent law enforcement.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia and city of nearly 10 million, will be holding its first open data challenge, HackJakarta, on April, 26,according to Setiaji, Head of Jakarta’s Information Development Planning Center, according to FutureGov news portal.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

jakartaJakarta, the capital of Indonesia and city of nearly 10 million, will be holding its first open data challenge, HackJakarta, on April, 26,according to Setiaji, Head of Jakarta’s Information Development Planning Center, according to FutureGov news portal.

He said that Jakarta is using open government and Big Data to help its city managers make more informed decisions. HackJakarta, which Setiaji is leading, is the first time that the city is opening up over 50 data sets in machine readable format and a crucial initiative as Indonesia is co-chairing the Open Government Partnership.

Setiaji also noted Jakarta’s Intelligent Transport System which connects to the traffic management center and local police for CCTV and traffic signals. The system was adapted from Australia. Residents are now able to get public transport information and the city is able to prioritise and manage its public transportation. There are currently around 1,000 CCTV cameras in Jakarta, and the number is expected to grow to 5,000 in an aim to make Jakarta a safer city.

“We’re only starting now and we will definitely improve in the future,” Setiaji said.

With 13 rivers flowing into Jakarta, flood management is another important area for Big Data applications. Jakarta’s new early warning system monitors risk indicators so that agencies are able to take quick action before the situation escalates.

The city sees around 15,000 projects being implemented every year and numerous parameters need to be taken into account for managing these projects. Jakarta’s project monitoring system combines all the parameters into one of three possible signals (similar to red, yellow or green on a traffic signal) so that city managers are able to quickly interpret the data and take action.

A big challenge for Jakarta’s city government is extracting value from and taking action on the huge volumes of data in the city systems, Setiaji stated. Another aspect that Jakarta’s government is improving on is collaboration between agencies.

As Jakarta travels down its Smart City roadmap, leapfrog changes must take place for the city to reach its ultimate goal, Setiaji said. A crucial step towards this is the city’s Intelligent Operations Centre (IOC), which will serve as the command and control centre bringing together different data sources for a holistic view of movements in the city.

Jakarta’s IOC takes inspiration from Rio de Janeiro’s and will leverage sensors to collect data, and combine and analyse it to automate collaborative response. Setiaji highlighted three main stages in the IOC action plan – leverage information, anticipate problems and coordinate responses.

“The IOC is the first step toward a smarter city because 40 per cent of city challenges lie in emergency response systems which test the agencies’ ability to coordinate their actions,” Setiaji noted. The IOC will ultimately enable agencies to prepare and forecast changes in urban dynamics.

An important lesson Setiaji shared is that inspirational leadership is important for the success of the Smart City vision, along with good communication, fair negotiation and consistent law enforcement.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid