Jakarta airport finally set for makeover

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Skyrocketing passenger growth has stressed the limits of Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta over the past years, but long-delayed upgrades in infrastructure are at last on the itinerary.

On August 2, the airport officially commenced expansion plans worth $805.6 million, inspired by the designs of renowned architect Paul Andreau, best known for planning airports such as Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris, France, Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China, and Dubai International Airport.

Blighted by snaking queues and delays at check-in counters, Indonesia’s busiest airport was originally built to handle 22 million passengers. In years past, however, the airport has welcomed more than 50 million people annually, and it is the fastest-growing airport in the world, according to the Airports Council International.

The project will remedy its current limitations by increasing the annual passenger capacity of Terminal 1, which serves domestic routes, from nine million to 18 million, while the capacity of Terminal 2, which serves international routes, with grow from nine million to 19 million, reported the Jakarta Post. The capacity of the newly built Terminal 3 will be boosted from four million passengers a year to 25 million. Once the project is completed the airport should be set to handle up to 62 million passengers.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono launched the project and was present at the groundbreaking ceremony in what is being seen as a fulcrum for continued growth.

Industry analysts expect the amount of fliers in the vast island nation to double within five years; that is, if lagging infrastructure doesn’t prompt an abrupt halt.

In 2011, 60 million Indonesian passengers passed through the country’s constrained security checkpoints, accounting for a 15 per cent year-on-year increase, according to the Ministry of Transportation. The same year saw international passengers grow 23 per cent, rising to eight million.

The 17,500-island nation of 240 million has a sizeable youth population, many of whom are sequestered in outlying regions with underdeveloped infrastructure and have never been on an airplane before. Indonesia’s ascension to affluence and size thus make it one of the world’s last great growth markets.

On July 26, Malaysia-based AirAsia Bhd, Asia’s largest low-cost air carrier, acquired Batavia Air, as reported by Inside Investor, in its first-ever airline purchase for $80 million.

In what CEO Tony Fernandes has called a “huge step”, the deal will give the carrier increased access to Southeast Asia’s largest economy, leading the airline mogul to announce his relocation to Jakarta to oversee the expansion.

“Indonesia is like a planet”, Fernandes told The New York Times. “There is lots of room to grow”.

A government-linked company, Garuda is to bulk up its fleet to 194 aircraft from 95 by 2015.

Not to be overlooked, Lion Air, Indonesia’s largest private airline, is experiencing rapid expansion as well and will tack on an additional 230 Boeing 737s to its fleet, worth a record $22.4 billion.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Skyrocketing passenger growth has stressed the limits of Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta over the past years, but long-delayed upgrades in infrastructure are at last on the itinerary.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Skyrocketing passenger growth has stressed the limits of Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta over the past years, but long-delayed upgrades in infrastructure are at last on the itinerary.

On August 2, the airport officially commenced expansion plans worth $805.6 million, inspired by the designs of renowned architect Paul Andreau, best known for planning airports such as Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris, France, Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China, and Dubai International Airport.

Blighted by snaking queues and delays at check-in counters, Indonesia’s busiest airport was originally built to handle 22 million passengers. In years past, however, the airport has welcomed more than 50 million people annually, and it is the fastest-growing airport in the world, according to the Airports Council International.

The project will remedy its current limitations by increasing the annual passenger capacity of Terminal 1, which serves domestic routes, from nine million to 18 million, while the capacity of Terminal 2, which serves international routes, with grow from nine million to 19 million, reported the Jakarta Post. The capacity of the newly built Terminal 3 will be boosted from four million passengers a year to 25 million. Once the project is completed the airport should be set to handle up to 62 million passengers.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono launched the project and was present at the groundbreaking ceremony in what is being seen as a fulcrum for continued growth.

Industry analysts expect the amount of fliers in the vast island nation to double within five years; that is, if lagging infrastructure doesn’t prompt an abrupt halt.

In 2011, 60 million Indonesian passengers passed through the country’s constrained security checkpoints, accounting for a 15 per cent year-on-year increase, according to the Ministry of Transportation. The same year saw international passengers grow 23 per cent, rising to eight million.

The 17,500-island nation of 240 million has a sizeable youth population, many of whom are sequestered in outlying regions with underdeveloped infrastructure and have never been on an airplane before. Indonesia’s ascension to affluence and size thus make it one of the world’s last great growth markets.

On July 26, Malaysia-based AirAsia Bhd, Asia’s largest low-cost air carrier, acquired Batavia Air, as reported by Inside Investor, in its first-ever airline purchase for $80 million.

In what CEO Tony Fernandes has called a “huge step”, the deal will give the carrier increased access to Southeast Asia’s largest economy, leading the airline mogul to announce his relocation to Jakarta to oversee the expansion.

“Indonesia is like a planet”, Fernandes told The New York Times. “There is lots of room to grow”.

A government-linked company, Garuda is to bulk up its fleet to 194 aircraft from 95 by 2015.

Not to be overlooked, Lion Air, Indonesia’s largest private airline, is experiencing rapid expansion as well and will tack on an additional 230 Boeing 737s to its fleet, worth a record $22.4 billion.

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