Lion Air’s rapid expansion questioned

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INDONESIA-ACCIDENT-AIRIndonesia’s Lion Air, the discount airline that placed the largest-ever order for Boeing in 2012 when it inked a deal for 230 planes and ordered another 234 Airbus planes only recently, has come under pressure that its rapid expansion might impact flight safety after one aircraft landed in the sea instead on the runway on Bali airport on April 13.

The reason for the crash of the brand new plane was still undetermined at the time of writing.

Lion Air, which began service in 2000, is currently building a discount airline network at a breakneck speed as it is aiming to compete directly with Southeast Asia’s most successful no-frills carrier, AirAsia. The company said it was considering partnerships in Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam with hopes of having 1,000 planes in 10 years. In Indonesia, Lion Air Lion Air already has a 45 per cent market share.

However, the expansion has brought to light several issues the airline has to resolve. Indonesia is one of the fastest-growing markets for airlines, but it has struggled to staff its planes with qualified pilots and service them with trained mechanics. Furthermore, troubles with air traffic control and outdated airport technology remain of concern.

Lion Air has also been involved in six accidents since 2002, four of which involved Boeing 737s and one of which resulted in 25 deaths. Indonesia accounts for 1.4 per cent of global traffic, but 4 per cent of all accidents, the International Air Transport Association said.

Five Lion Air pilots were arrested during the past two years for drugs, according to local media reports, raising questions of whether drug abuse or overwork are widespread on the carrier.

Finally, Lion Air was banned from flying to Europe in 2007 due to broader safety concerns in the Indonesian airline industry. Although the EU lifted the ban on many other Indonesian carriers in 2009, Lion Air remains blocked.

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Indonesia’s Lion Air, the discount airline that placed the largest-ever order for Boeing in 2012 when it inked a deal for 230 planes and ordered another 234 Airbus planes only recently, has come under pressure that its rapid expansion might impact flight safety after one aircraft landed in the sea instead on the runway on Bali airport on April 13.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

INDONESIA-ACCIDENT-AIRIndonesia’s Lion Air, the discount airline that placed the largest-ever order for Boeing in 2012 when it inked a deal for 230 planes and ordered another 234 Airbus planes only recently, has come under pressure that its rapid expansion might impact flight safety after one aircraft landed in the sea instead on the runway on Bali airport on April 13.

The reason for the crash of the brand new plane was still undetermined at the time of writing.

Lion Air, which began service in 2000, is currently building a discount airline network at a breakneck speed as it is aiming to compete directly with Southeast Asia’s most successful no-frills carrier, AirAsia. The company said it was considering partnerships in Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam with hopes of having 1,000 planes in 10 years. In Indonesia, Lion Air Lion Air already has a 45 per cent market share.

However, the expansion has brought to light several issues the airline has to resolve. Indonesia is one of the fastest-growing markets for airlines, but it has struggled to staff its planes with qualified pilots and service them with trained mechanics. Furthermore, troubles with air traffic control and outdated airport technology remain of concern.

Lion Air has also been involved in six accidents since 2002, four of which involved Boeing 737s and one of which resulted in 25 deaths. Indonesia accounts for 1.4 per cent of global traffic, but 4 per cent of all accidents, the International Air Transport Association said.

Five Lion Air pilots were arrested during the past two years for drugs, according to local media reports, raising questions of whether drug abuse or overwork are widespread on the carrier.

Finally, Lion Air was banned from flying to Europe in 2007 due to broader safety concerns in the Indonesian airline industry. Although the EU lifted the ban on many other Indonesian carriers in 2009, Lion Air remains blocked.

 

 

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