Malaysia accepts US firm’s offer to resume search for flight MH370

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Search vessel Seabed Constructor

The Malaysian government has eventually accepted US firm Ocean Infinity’s “no find, no fee” offer to resume the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, according to various media reports.

Under the agreement, Malaysia will pay a multimillion-dollar fee only if the company manages to find the missing Boeing 777.

Houston, Texas-based  Ocean Infinity already chartered Norwegian ship Seabed Constructor for the search, which set sail from South Africa on January 2 and is due to arrive in Perth, Australia on February 7.

The Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 disappeared on March 8, 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board, sparking the largest search in aviation history, which remained unsuccessful despite costing about $200 million for maritime specialists, nautic crews and top-notch search equipment.

The joint search operations by Malaysia, China and Australia were suspended in January 2017, much to the anguish of distraught passenger relatives. At the time of suspension, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau released findings by scientists that identified a smaller ocean area north of the original search area, saying there was a “high probability” that the aircraft was somewhere there.

Ocean Infinity said it will focus its search on that part of the ocean floor, an area spanning over 25.000 square kilometers, and expects it will need about a month for it.

The Norwegian ship, the Seabed Constructor, is understood to be the most advanced civilian survey vessel on the planet today. If its array of technology –  including eight autonomous, titanium-reinforced submarines with highly advanced sensitive electronics and able to dive 6,000 meters – cannot find MH370, then it is likely that nothing will, and that the mystery of MH370 will remain unsolved.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Search vessel Seabed Constructor

The Malaysian government has eventually accepted US firm Ocean Infinity’s “no find, no fee” offer to resume the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, according to various media reports.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Search vessel Seabed Constructor

The Malaysian government has eventually accepted US firm Ocean Infinity’s “no find, no fee” offer to resume the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, according to various media reports.

Under the agreement, Malaysia will pay a multimillion-dollar fee only if the company manages to find the missing Boeing 777.

Houston, Texas-based  Ocean Infinity already chartered Norwegian ship Seabed Constructor for the search, which set sail from South Africa on January 2 and is due to arrive in Perth, Australia on February 7.

The Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 disappeared on March 8, 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board, sparking the largest search in aviation history, which remained unsuccessful despite costing about $200 million for maritime specialists, nautic crews and top-notch search equipment.

The joint search operations by Malaysia, China and Australia were suspended in January 2017, much to the anguish of distraught passenger relatives. At the time of suspension, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau released findings by scientists that identified a smaller ocean area north of the original search area, saying there was a “high probability” that the aircraft was somewhere there.

Ocean Infinity said it will focus its search on that part of the ocean floor, an area spanning over 25.000 square kilometers, and expects it will need about a month for it.

The Norwegian ship, the Seabed Constructor, is understood to be the most advanced civilian survey vessel on the planet today. If its array of technology –  including eight autonomous, titanium-reinforced submarines with highly advanced sensitive electronics and able to dive 6,000 meters – cannot find MH370, then it is likely that nothing will, and that the mystery of MH370 will remain unsolved.

Do you like this post?
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