Malaysia admits MH370 pilot trained Indian Ocean route

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MH370 flight simulatorMalaysia’s Transport Ministry confirmed that “one of the pilots” of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had trained a course on his home flight simulator to the southern Indian Ocean, where the missing jet is believed to have crashed.

Previously, Malaysian officials vigorously denied reports that the plane’s captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah plotted such a flight and also did not mention the evidence in the official report on the MH370 disappearance, giving the entire investigation into the mysterious event by Malaysia less credibility in the eyes of some observers.

Families an relatives of the victims repeatedly blamed Malaysian authorities for a cover-up and incompetence.

In fact, it is the first time Malaysia has acknowledged the route was indeed on Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah’s simulator.

New York magazine reported last month that an FBI analysis of the device showed Zaharie had conducted a simulated flight to the southern Indian Ocean less than a month before the plane vanished along a similar route. The magazine cited the discovery as strong evidence that the disappearance was a premeditated act of mass murder-suicide at the hands of the captain, particularly because the flight has been deleted – but investigators were able to recover it.

Australian officials overseeing the search for the plane last month also said data recovered from the simulator included a flight path to the southern Indian Ocean. The location of the possible ditching would be a few hundred kilometers southeast of the current search area, though.

Meanwhile, one investigator found that a flaperon — a small section of the wing that washed ashore on Reunion island off East Africa last year — of the Boeing 777 was broken off, indicating controlled ditching of the plane. He disclosed that severe erosion along the trailing edge of two wing parts indicate this.

A pilot suicide could have wide-ranging consequences. If it transpires that the flight ended indeed in a deliberate crash, claimants could be denied insurance coverage. This includes the families who missed the two-year deadline under the Montreal Convention to file claims against the airline company.

Aviation policies, under sanction of the Montreal Convention, carry exclusions for suicide and terrorism. This is notwithstanding the question of Malaysian Airlines successfully determining the cause of the crash.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Malaysia’s Transport Ministry confirmed that “one of the pilots” of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had trained a course on his home flight simulator to the southern Indian Ocean, where the missing jet is believed to have crashed.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

MH370 flight simulatorMalaysia’s Transport Ministry confirmed that “one of the pilots” of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had trained a course on his home flight simulator to the southern Indian Ocean, where the missing jet is believed to have crashed.

Previously, Malaysian officials vigorously denied reports that the plane’s captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah plotted such a flight and also did not mention the evidence in the official report on the MH370 disappearance, giving the entire investigation into the mysterious event by Malaysia less credibility in the eyes of some observers.

Families an relatives of the victims repeatedly blamed Malaysian authorities for a cover-up and incompetence.

In fact, it is the first time Malaysia has acknowledged the route was indeed on Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah’s simulator.

New York magazine reported last month that an FBI analysis of the device showed Zaharie had conducted a simulated flight to the southern Indian Ocean less than a month before the plane vanished along a similar route. The magazine cited the discovery as strong evidence that the disappearance was a premeditated act of mass murder-suicide at the hands of the captain, particularly because the flight has been deleted – but investigators were able to recover it.

Australian officials overseeing the search for the plane last month also said data recovered from the simulator included a flight path to the southern Indian Ocean. The location of the possible ditching would be a few hundred kilometers southeast of the current search area, though.

Meanwhile, one investigator found that a flaperon — a small section of the wing that washed ashore on Reunion island off East Africa last year — of the Boeing 777 was broken off, indicating controlled ditching of the plane. He disclosed that severe erosion along the trailing edge of two wing parts indicate this.

A pilot suicide could have wide-ranging consequences. If it transpires that the flight ended indeed in a deliberate crash, claimants could be denied insurance coverage. This includes the families who missed the two-year deadline under the Montreal Convention to file claims against the airline company.

Aviation policies, under sanction of the Montreal Convention, carry exclusions for suicide and terrorism. This is notwithstanding the question of Malaysian Airlines successfully determining the cause of the crash.

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