Malaysia has 93 female board directors

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eorang pelaku usaha mengikuti konferensi jarak jauh Doing Business 2010 yang diadakan International Finance Corporation di Jakarta, Rabu (9/9).Since January this year, 93 women in Malaysia have joined the boards of public-listed companies as directors, the Women, Family and Community Development ministry said according to The Star. This, said its minister Rohani Abdul Karim, was among the successes following the Government’s efforts towards achieving the targeted 30 per cent women in decision-making positions by 2016.

Speaking at the opening of the Women Extraordinaire Forum 2013 in Kuala Lumpur on November 20, Rohani said the ministry, through the NAM Institute for the Empowerment of Women (NIEW), had also set up a Women Directors Registry. The registry compiled data on Malay­sian women qualified for these positions.

“The registry addresses the issue faced by corporate companies sourcing for capable women to fill board positions,” she said in her speech before opening the forum.

The policy, announced in 2011, targets to have women holding 30 per cent of decision-making positions in Malaysia by 2016. Rohani said the ministry had also implemented a Women Director’s Programme, which is a training curriculum that includes coaching on technical and soft skills. To date, she said, 645 women had undergone the training.

In Malaysia, she said, 68.02 per cent of those enrolled to pursue their first degree were women while in the corporate sector, the percentage of women professionals out of the total number of working women has increased from 7.5 per cent in 2005 to 14.8 per cent in 2012.

Later, former United Malays National Organisation (UMNO) women’s wing chief Rafidah Aziz, a speaker at the forum, said the Malaysian government’s plan to achieve at least 30 per cent women representation in decision-making positions could prove to be a setback for women.

“We do not want companies to be forced to appoint women just to fulfil a quota, regardless of their capabilities. This is an insult to women. Companies must choose people who are qualified and competent, regardless of gender,” she said.

Rafidah added that the policy could also create a “quota syndrome” which could limit women to only holding 30 per cent of the positions and not more than that, even if they were qualified.

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Since January this year, 93 women in Malaysia have joined the boards of public-listed companies as directors, the Women, Family and Community Development ministry said according to The Star. This, said its minister Rohani Abdul Karim, was among the successes following the Government’s efforts towards achieving the targeted 30 per cent women in decision-making positions by 2016.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

eorang pelaku usaha mengikuti konferensi jarak jauh Doing Business 2010 yang diadakan International Finance Corporation di Jakarta, Rabu (9/9).Since January this year, 93 women in Malaysia have joined the boards of public-listed companies as directors, the Women, Family and Community Development ministry said according to The Star. This, said its minister Rohani Abdul Karim, was among the successes following the Government’s efforts towards achieving the targeted 30 per cent women in decision-making positions by 2016.

Speaking at the opening of the Women Extraordinaire Forum 2013 in Kuala Lumpur on November 20, Rohani said the ministry, through the NAM Institute for the Empowerment of Women (NIEW), had also set up a Women Directors Registry. The registry compiled data on Malay­sian women qualified for these positions.

“The registry addresses the issue faced by corporate companies sourcing for capable women to fill board positions,” she said in her speech before opening the forum.

The policy, announced in 2011, targets to have women holding 30 per cent of decision-making positions in Malaysia by 2016. Rohani said the ministry had also implemented a Women Director’s Programme, which is a training curriculum that includes coaching on technical and soft skills. To date, she said, 645 women had undergone the training.

In Malaysia, she said, 68.02 per cent of those enrolled to pursue their first degree were women while in the corporate sector, the percentage of women professionals out of the total number of working women has increased from 7.5 per cent in 2005 to 14.8 per cent in 2012.

Later, former United Malays National Organisation (UMNO) women’s wing chief Rafidah Aziz, a speaker at the forum, said the Malaysian government’s plan to achieve at least 30 per cent women representation in decision-making positions could prove to be a setback for women.

“We do not want companies to be forced to appoint women just to fulfil a quota, regardless of their capabilities. This is an insult to women. Companies must choose people who are qualified and competent, regardless of gender,” she said.

Rafidah added that the policy could also create a “quota syndrome” which could limit women to only holding 30 per cent of the positions and not more than that, even if they were qualified.

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